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My dear readers, I am so excited to have Nicole Clarkston as my guest again today. She has written a new scene tied to her Pride and Prejudice variation These Dreams, which made my Best of 2017 list (click to read my review). I’ll let her introduce the scene and the giveaway, so please give her a warm welcome:

Thank you, Anna, for having me today on your blog! It is always a pleasure chatting with you. Today I bring you a scene related to These Dreams, featuring everyone’s favourite Colonel Fitzwilliam (before he was a colonel). This short scene is set three years prior to the events of Pride and Prejudice (and also These Dreams).

Richard Fitzwilliam was wounded in battle in Portugal, but had befriended young Portuguese Lieutenant Rodrigo (Ruy) de Noronha. Invited to convalesce at his new friend’s family home in Lisbon, Richard made the acquaintance of the lieutenant’s lovely young sister Amália. Their initial meeting appeared first as a blog post on Austen Variations and then as a post-script after the epilogue of These Dreams. Today’s vignette, however, you will only find here. Enjoy it, and stick around for a chance to enter the giveaway at the end!

~NC

~

Major Richard Fitzwilliam, decorated commander of the First Division Light Cavalry and an acclaimed hero of the battlefield, was in full retreat.

Oh, he would never confess as much. It would be too disgraceful, if any of his comrades in arms detected signs of weakness in his warrior’s armor. But there it was, a fissure the size of a Derbyshire canyon, cracking right through his chest into his viscera. And it widened every time she smiled at him.

Amália. He had never heard a lovelier name. Both sweet and flinty, gentle yet perplexing. It suited her, this enigma of a girl, barely old enough to dress as a lady and act as her father’s hostess. She came near him now, those delicious pearly teeth and peerless golden eyes flashing in an artless smile as she clutched a book in her hand. “Major, you are not in town with Ruy today?”

He looked up from the writing desk where he was composing a letter to his father. He shifted in the chair, pressing back against his seat and holding his breath, lest he catch her fragrance again. “Not today. He had some business with his commanding officer, but I do not report until next week.”

“Then you will be leaving us, no?”

Was that a tinge of wistfulness in her voice?

Richard cleared his throat. “Only if I have overstayed my welcome. I am to report, but I am not required to remain with my regiment. My commanding officer does not desire me back on active duty until my arm is fully healed.”

She smiled again… blast. “You are most welcome to remain here, Major. My father, he is… honoured, no? He tells everyone how you save Ruy.”

Richard’s neck felt hot. “I fear his narrative does your brother too little credit. The Lieutenant’s actions and bravery gave much courage to his men. Likely enough, we would both have been killed if the line had faltered.”

Her expression froze, and he could see the horrifying reality playing through her thoughts even behind her lingering smile.

“But let us speak of other things,” he corrected swiftly. “It was generous of your father to offer his hospitality.”

She warmed again, glanced about, and finally settled herself into a chair opposite him. “He wished to hold a dinner party for you and Ruy, but that would not be proper just now.”

“Nor would I wish him to exert the effort. I am simply grateful for such a comfortable and welcoming house in which to convalesce, though I do not quite share my commanding officer’s opinion that I must take such a long time about doing it.”

Those eyes sparkled again as she opened her book. “One must not attempt to heal too quickly, Major.” She dropped her attention to the pages then, giving every impression that she had sought this room, and that very chair, simply so she might enjoy her book in proximity to him.

They were hardly alone in the room, though it seemed that way to Richard. A woman of reduced circumstances, as they would have called her in England, always shadowed the daughter of the house, and half a dozen others came and went in that room on some errand or another. None, however, spoke to either of them, and the two were left in an uncomfortable peace. Uncomfortable to him, at least, and becoming more so by the minute.

He squirmed in his chair, doing his best to not think of her soft pale gown, or the way the spirals of hair curled round her tender neck, or the delicate fragrance which was even now assaulting his senses… dash it all.  He snatched the paper on which he had been writing and crumpled it for the fire, for he had written some words which had nothing at all to do with correspondence with his father.

She looked up in mute surprise as he thrust the wad of notepaper to the front of the desk, but he glanced at her only long enough to acknowledge her notice. He forced his attention back on the fresh sheet before him, flexing his fingers and shuffling his feet beneath the desk.

Seven hours. That was how long he could remain at attention without flinching. He knew, for he had done it not long ago; polished and ready for battle atop his charger, with a heavy bayonet at his shoulder. Seven bloody hours. He blinked a sudden rivulet of perspiration from his eyes. Apparently, he could not last even seven minutes with her in the room.

The paper was still blank, and he used the back of his hand to surreptitiously wipe another bead of sweat from his brow. It had nothing to do with the Portuguese summer heat, either, for it was still… not even June, and his composure was faltering by the second.

Darcy could have done it. Richard’s fingers tightened on the quill as he thinned his lips. Oh, yes, Fitzwilliam Darcy could have successfully ignored a woman with a book… whose eyes made his spine tingle every time they rose from her page. That old stick, he could have made a woman feel the full measure of his casual disregard, and suffered not a moment’s discomfort for it! Unlike himself… Richard writhed in his chair again.

“Major, you are not unwell?” that musical voice queried.

“I?” he jerked faintly. It was difficult enough to pretend that all his senses were not trained on her, without her bloody speaking to him! He had not been prepared for that. He cleared his throat again. “No, I am quite well.”

“You are not too warm? The sun, no, it comes in through the window. Perhaps you would prefer the garden air? Your letter would be easier after a walk, no?”

Oh, not the garden! He would never survive, not if she offered to act as his guide again. “I am quite well, thank you. I do not write quickly or easily. A family trait, I am afraid.”

“Then we must find some way to set you at your ease.” She rose, leaving her book in the seat. “Do you like reading, Major?”

“I used to. I have little time or patience for it now.”

“What of music? It relaxes the mind, no?”

That was precisely what he did not need, but he made an amiable reply. “It is a particular weakness of mine,” he answered, his voice lower than he would have liked. “And of every soldier, so far as I know, senhorita.”

“Then it will be my pleasure,” she beamed. “Senhora Ramires,” she turned to her companion, “will you play for the Major, and I will sing?” She turned back to him then, clasping her hands in apology. “I am hopeless on the instrument, but I do love to sing.”

She seemed to be waiting for him to rise, which he did—rather stiffly. He made her a quick, playful bow, mostly to hide something of his discomposure, and then… his stomach leaped somewhere into this throat when she blithely took his good arm to walk toward the piano. He stopped when she did, then gratefully dropped into the seat she indicated and crossed his legs.

She nodded to her companion, who dutifully took up the notes of a song he did not know. The opening lines were unremarkable enough, and would likely have remained so in his memory, until she lifted her voice.

He could not understand most of the words. He had a passing familiarity with Portuguese, and more so now than ever, but some combination of emotion and inflection rendered half the words foreign to him. He did not need them, however, to interpret the meaning of the song. She sang of young love, of searching and loss, despair, and then joy at reunion. Her clear voice rang with such power and intensity that tears began to pool in the corners of his eyes during the verses of tragedy and mourning.

The tone gradually changed, growing and building with the fire of hope. His eyes fixed upon her lithe figure, swaying as the music possessed her, capturing her breath until she gasped faintly between the lines and her feminine shape seemed ready to burst with the force of the passion the song had awakened. Just as the melody swelled to its most glorious, she met his eye, a faint smile about her lips as she continued to sing. Richard could not remember when he had last drawn breath, nor did he feel inclined to try to do so now.

He should stop her. He should declare himself unfit for company and retire to his room… and rejoin his regiment at first light tomorrow. Another trickle of moisture troubled him, but this time, he realised, it was a tear. And then a second. They mirrored the tears of the singer as she poured forth joy and lament, suffering and triumph, and with her final loving notes, Richard Fitzwilliam’s last defences fell.

Her voice quieted, like the dying breeze on the battlefield that leaves the flags limp and shell-shot at the end of the day. A soft sigh—hers or his, he was not certain—and the ruin was complete. He sat there in the deafening stillness, his skin still prickling and his lips parted, just as were hers.

She was staring at him now, the hands she had lifted at the pinnacle of her song now lowered, her breath slowing. Five seconds… the handspan of time it took for a fuse to detonate its source, but the shuddering, racking pain exploded within his own heart.

She blinked, and he did the same. The spell, for the moment, was lifted, but never again would it be broken. At her brother’s voice in the outer hall, Amália drew a refreshing breath, smiled, and dipped him a curtsey. “I hope the song gave you some peace, Major,” she offered, a blush staining her youthful cheeks.

“I would not call it peace, senhorita, but it is a performance I shall never forget,” he answered in a husky voice.

She dashed the last of the moisture from her eyes, a relic of several seconds ago, and her expression brightened again to that of the girl he had thought he knew. “Perhaps we will go to Ruy now?” she suggested.

He rose at last, then gave her his arm to walk together toward her brother. She took it with girlish grace, smiling up at him, and the yawning ache widened in his soul. In two weeks’ time, he would leave her behind, never again to be troubled by her intoxicating scent, her lyrical voice, or those bewitching, golden eyes. The arm she clasped would be given again in service to King and Country, safe from her reach. His heart, however, had declared its home– in the palm of her hand.

~

Well, do you love the dear colonel as much as I do? So many of us know him as “Richard,” even though Jane Austen never gave him a name. It’s strange how his is one of the many characters Austen scarcely introduces, and he has come to life for us as a fully developed persona. Perhaps it is a combination of the fertile minds of JAFF authors and the fabulous actors who have portrayed this gentleman.

What do you think, who is the best film version of Colonel Fitzwilliam? Leave your thoughts, and you will be entered in our giveaway. Up for grabs is a reader’s choice of any of my books in any available format. The giveaway is international, so scroll our lovely men and name your pick!

 

Gerald Oliver Smith from the 1940 Pride and Prejudice

Desmond Adams from the 1980 Pride and Prejudice

Anthony Calf from the 1995 Pride and Prejudice

Cornelius Booth from the 2005 Pride and Prejudice

Tom Ward from Death Comes to Pemberley

~

Thank you so much, Nicole! I absolutely loved Richard and Amália in These Dreams, so it was wonderful to see them again. I have a soft spot for the 1940 Pride and Prejudice since it was the first film version I saw, though it was so different from the book. But there’s something very appealing about Tom Ward… 😉

For the giveaway, please leave a comment with your answer to Nicole’s question, and include your email address so I can contact you if you win. The giveaway will close on Friday, January 26, 2017. The winner will be chosen randomly and announced in the comments section of this post. Good luck!

~

About These Dreams

An abandoned bride
A missing man
And a dream that refuses to die…

Pride and patriotism lend fervor to greed and cruelty, and Fitzwilliam Darcy is caught at the centre of a decades-old international feud. Taken far from England, presumed dead by his family, and lost to all he holds dear, only one name remains as his beacon in the darkness: Elizabeth.

Georgiana Darcy is now the reluctant, heartbroken heiress to Pemberley, and Colonel Fitwilliam her bewildered guardian. Vulnerable and unprepared, Georgiana desperately longs for a friend, while Fitzwilliam seeks to protect her from his own family. As the conspiracy around Darcy’s death widens and questions mount, Colonel Fitzwilliam must confront his own past. An impossible dream, long ago sacrificed for duty, may become his only hope.

Newly married Lydia Wickham returns to Longbourn — alone and under mysterious circumstances. Elizabeth Bennet watches one sister suffer and another find joy, while she lives her own days in empty regrets over what might have been. Believing Darcy lost forever, she closes her heart against both pain
and happiness, but finds no escape from her dreams of him.

Goodreads | Amazon U.S. | Amazon U.K.

~

About the Author

Nicole Clarkston

Nicole Clarkston is a book lover and a happily married mom of three. Originally from Idaho, she now lives in Oregon with her own romantic hero, several horses, and one very fat dog. She has loved crafting alternate stories and sequels since she was a child watching Disney’s Robin Hood, and she is never found sitting quietly without a book of some sort.

Nicole discovered Jane Austen rather by guilt in her early thirties―how does any book worm really live that long without a little P&P? She has never looked back. A year or so later, during a major house renovation project, she discovered Elizabeth Gaskell and fell completely in love. Her need for more time with these characters led her to simultaneously write Rumours & Recklessness, a P&P inspired novel, and No Such Thing as Luck, a N&S inspired novel. Both immediately became best selling books. The success she had with her first attempt at writing led her to write three other novels that are her pitiful homage to two authors who have so deeply inspired her.

Nicole was recently invited to join Austenvariations.com, a group of talented authors in the Jane Austen Fiction genre. In addition to her work with the Austen Variations blog, Nicole can be reached through Facebook at http://fb.me/NicoleClarkstonAuthor, Twitter @N_Clarkston, her blog at Goodreads.com, or her personal blog and website, NicoleClarkson.com.

Connect with Nicole: Website | Goodreads Author Page | Goodreads Blog | Facebook | Amazon Author Page | Twitter

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I read 73 books last year, and while I enjoyed most of them, there are a handful that really stood out. Here are my top 10 favorites, with links to my reviews (in no particular order):

The Women in the Castle by Jessica Shattuck

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

Darcy by Any Other Name by Laura Hile

The Honorable Mr. Darcy by Jennifer Joy

The Best Part of Love by A. D’Orazio

A Lie Universally Hiddenby Anngela Schroeder

T

he Darcy Monologues edited by Christina Boyd

Rules for a Successful Book Club by Victoria Connelly

These Dreams by Nicole Clarkston

The Particular Charm of Miss Jane Austen by Ada Bright and Cass Grafton

Honorable Mentions (in no particular order):

Wait for the Rain by Maria Murnane

Attempting Elizabeth by Jessica Grey

Darcy’s Hope at Donwell Abbey by Ginger Monette

Mendacity & Mourning by J.L. Ashton

A Most Handsome Gentleman by Suzan Lauder

What were your favorite books of 2017? Please tell me in the comments!

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Source: Review copy from author

She was adrift, without direction or inspiration. And for what? For the loss of something which had ever been hers? For envy of her beloved Jane, or disappointment over Lydia? A flash of anger rose in her eyes — the only life to spark back from her mirror. No! She swiped her hand over the flame, quenching it with a quick, stinging pinch of her fingers. There must be more.

(from These Dreams)

Nicole Clarkston’s These Dreams, a variation of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, is a novel I was forced to savor because of my busy schedule, but really I wanted to devour it in one sitting. This was one of the most creative — and angsty — variations I’ve ever read. I loved all the twists and turns, and even though it was hard to see my favorite characters brought so low, Clarkston does a fantastic job getting into their heads.

These Dreams opens as Mr. Darcy is orchestrating the marriage of Lydia Bennet and Mr. Wickham, except he doesn’t show up for the wedding, which pains Elizabeth at a time when she thought they would have a second chance. Darcy is brutally captured as part of a complex scheme dating back generations, and his family and friends believe him to be dead. Both Darcy and Elizabeth are in dark, hopeless situations, grieving what might have been.

Meanwhile, Colonel Fitzwilliam finds himself in charge of Darcy’s estate and sole guardian of Darcy’s sister, Georgiana, who is heartbroken at the loss of her brother and pulled every which way by family members who believe they have her best interests — and that of the Darcy name and estate — at heart. Fitzwilliam enlists the help of Elizabeth to bring some light back into Georgiana’s life and help her take the reins as mistress of Pemberley, which makes it possible for him to investigate his cousin’s death and unravel the many threads to the conspiracy that ultimately rips the bandage off his wounded heart.

Clarkston did a great job crafting a multilayered story with chaos and possible scandal at every turn. It was impossible to know who to trust, and she handles the healing of these damaged souls in a tender and realistic manner. I loved how Clarkston forged a special bond between Elizabeth and her newly married sister Lydia, allowing them to find some common ground amid their trauma and giving more depth to a character who is usually written off as foolish and unrepentant. There also were plenty of intriguing original characters, especially Amália, who reminded me so much of Elizabeth in her outspokenness and strength.

I absolutely loved These Dreams, even though the pain she caused Darcy and Elizabeth was like a punch to the gut at times. I had no idea how it was going to play out, so I just went along for the ride, and it was so worth it. Trust me, Clarkston doesn’t make you suffer too, too long, and all that pain makes the outcome so much sweeter. Definitely a contender for my Best of 2017 list!

****

About These Dreams

An abandoned bride
A missing man
And a dream that refuses to die…

Pride and patriotism lend fervor to greed and cruelty, and Fitzwilliam Darcy is caught at the centre of a decades-old international feud. Taken far from England, presumed dead by his family, and lost to all he holds dear, only one name remains as his beacon in the darkness: Elizabeth.

Georgiana Darcy is now the reluctant, heartbroken heiress to Pemberley, and Colonel Fitwilliam her bewildered guardian. Vulnerable and unprepared, Georgiana desperately longs for a friend, while Fitzwilliam seeks to protect her from his own family. As the conspiracy around Darcy’s death widens and questions mount, Colonel Fitzwilliam must confront his own past. An impossible dream, long ago sacrificed for duty, may become his only hope.

Newly married Lydia Wickham returns to Longbourn — alone and under mysterious circumstances. Elizabeth Bennet watches one sister suffer and another find joy, while she lives her own days in empty regrets over what might have been. Believing Darcy lost forever, she closes her heart against both pain
and happiness, but finds no escape from her dreams of him.

Goodreads | Amazon U.S. | Amazon U.K.

****

About the Author

Nicole Clarkston

Nicole Clarkston is a book lover and a happily married mom of three. Originally from Idaho, she now lives in Oregon with her own romantic hero, several horses, and one very fat dog. She has loved crafting alternate stories and sequels since she was a child watching Disney’s Robin Hood, and she is never found sitting quietly without a book of some sort.

Nicole discovered Jane Austen rather by guilt in her early thirties―how does any book worm really live that long without a little P&P? She has never looked back. A year or so later, during a major house renovation project, she discovered Elizabeth Gaskell and fell completely in love. Her need for more time with these characters led her to simultaneously write Rumours & Recklessness, a P&P inspired novel, and No Such Thing as Luck, a N&S inspired novel. Both immediately became best selling books. The success she had with her first attempt at writing led her to write three other novels that are her pitiful homage to two authors who have so deeply inspired her.

Nicole was recently invited to join Austenvariations.com, a group of talented authors in the Jane Austen Fiction genre. In addition to her work with the Austen Variations blog, Nicole can be reached through Facebook at http://fb.me/NicoleClarkstonAuthor, Twitter @N_Clarkston, her blog at Goodreads.com, or her personal blog and website, NicoleClarkson.com.

Connect with Nicole: Website | Goodreads Author Page | Goodreads Blog | Facebook | Amazon Author Page | Twitter

****

Giveaway

Please click here to enter the Rafflecopter giveaway, where 10 ebook copies are up for grabs. This giveaway is open internationally.

Terms and Conditions:

Readers may enter the drawing by tweeting once a day and daily commenting on a blog post or review that has a giveaway attached for the tour. Entrants must provide the name of the blog where they commented. Remember: Tweet and comment once daily to earn extra entries.

A winner may win ONLY 1 (ONE) eBook of These Dreams by Nicole Clarkston. Each winner will be randomly selected by Rafflecopter and the giveaway is international.

****

09/19   So little time…; Guest Post, Excerpt, Giveaway

09/20   My Jane Austen Book Club; Vignette, Giveaway

09/21   From Pemberley to Milton; Review, Giveaway

09/22   Interests of a Jane Austen Girl; Review, Excerpt, Giveaway

09/23   Just Jane 1813; Review, Giveaway

09/24   My Vices and Weaknesses; Excerpt, Giveaway

09/25   Babblings of a Bookworm;  Guest Post or Vignette, Giveaway

09/26   Diary of an Eccentric; Review, Giveaway

09/27   Half Agony, Half Hope; Review, Excerpt

09/28   Darcyholic Diversions; Author Interview, Giveaway

09/29   My Love for Jane Austen; Charcter Interview, Giveaway

09/30   Margie’s Must Reads; Guest Post, Excerpt, Giveaway

10/01   Savvy Verse and Wit; Review, Giveaway

10/02   Austenesque Reviews; Character Interview, Giveaway

10/03   Obsessed with Mr. Darcy; Review, Giveaway

10/04   From Pemberley to Milton; Guest Post, Giveaway

Disclosure: I received a copy of These Dreams from the author for review.

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Source: Review copy from author
Rating: ★★★★☆

In another ten or fifteen years, Jane wold likely be the sweetheart of the county, and it would be a lucky man who won her hand. Lizzy, however…he shook his head. She would need a husband with an iron will! Whoever the man should be, Gardiner decided, he had best win the girl’s respect early, for Lizzy would not be apt to grant him a second chance.

(from The Courtship of Edward Gardiner)

Nicole Clarkston’s newest novel, The Courtship of Edward Gardiner, is a prequel to Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice that centers on Mrs. Bennet’s brother, Edward Gardiner. Mr. Gardiner has worked hard to build up his business in trade in London and finally has the means to support a family. After being rejected by a Miss Rutherford, a brokenhearted Mr. Gardiner finds himself on the way to Sheffield with his brother-in-law, Thomas Bennet, and his oldest daughters, eight-year-old Jane and seven-year-old Elizabeth. When Jane falls ill, the uncle and his nieces are forced to stay in the village of Lambton while Mr. Bennet journeys toward his ill brother. It is in Lambton that Mr. Gardiner meets Madeline Fairbanks, the daughter of a bookkeeper who has been hired to care for the Bennet sisters during their stay in the village.

Mr. Gardiner is almost immediately captivated by Miss Fairbanks. After all, she is sweet, kind, and clever, and while other young ladies are worried about gowns and ribbons, Madeline helps her ailing father with his business. In short, she is the woman Edward has been waiting for but didn’t believe truly existed. But how are they to build any sort of relationship when he will be heading back to London in a matter of days?

The Courtship of Edward Gardiner is a charming novel that puts Elizabeth’s favorite aunt and uncle in the spotlight and imagines how they might have met. I adored Edward and Madeline, as well as the Madeline’s dear friend, Mrs. Porter, the innkeeper. It was also fascinating to get a glimpse of Elizabeth as a rambunctious, outspoken little girl, and especially to see a 14-year-old Fitzwilliam Darcy as he helps his little sister through their grief after their mother’s passing, struggles to keep his pride in check, and begins to understand all of the responsibilities he will one day have as Master of Pemberley. A young Lizzy and Darcy butting heads during a hailstorm, and Mr. Bennet having his fun at Lady Catherine’s expense were some of my favorite scenes.

I generally enjoy when authors put Austen’s secondary characters at the forefront, and Clarkston’s novel is the first I’ve seen that focuses on the Gardiners. The Courtship of Edward Gardiner is a delightful tale, with plenty of humor and excitement mixed in with the romance. This is the first book I’ve read by Clarkston, but it definitely won’t be the last!

***

About The Courtship of Edward Gardiner

Every great love has a beginning.

In Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, we meet with perhaps the most sensible, caring relatives a lovelorn young woman could hope for: Mr and Mrs Gardiner. What is their story?

Edward Gardiner has just been refused by the lovely young woman he had intended to make his wife. Heartbroken and eager for a diversion, he accepts an invitation from his brother-in-law, Thomas Bennet, to accompany him along with his two eldest daughters to the north on family business. Gardiner’s pleasure tour is interrupted, however, when his eldest niece falls ill and is unable to travel farther.

Stopping over in the scarcely remarkable village of Lambton, the men decide that Bennet must continue on, while Gardiner and the children remain. The only trouble is that Gardiner has not the least idea how he should care for one ailing niece and another who is ready to drive him to distraction… until he meets with Madeline Fairbanks.

Check out The Courtship of Edward Gardiner on Amazon | Goodreads

***

About the Author

Nicole Clarkston

Nicole Clarkston

Nicole Clarkston is the pen name of a very bashful writer who will not allow any of her family or friends to read what she writes. She grew up in Idaho on horseback, and if she could have figured out how to read a book at the same time, she would have. She initially pursued a degree in foreign languages and education, and then lost patience with it, switched her major, and changed schools. She now resides in Oregon with her husband of 15 years, 3 homeschooled kids, and a very worthless degree in Poultry Science (don’t ask).

Nicole discovered Jane Austen rather by guilt in her early thirties- how does any book worm really live that long without a little P&P? She has never looked back. A year or so later, during a major house renovation project (undertaken when her husband unsuspectingly left town for a few days) she discovered Elizabeth Gaskell and fell completely in love. Nicole’s books are her pitiful homage to two authors who have so deeply inspired her.

Connect with Nicole Clarkston via Website | Facebook | Goodreads Author Page | Goodreads Blog | Amazon Author Page

***

Giveaway

Nicole is generously offering a copy of The Courtship of Edward Gardiner in a reader’s choice (ebook or paperback) giveaway, open internationally! To enter, please leave a comment with your email address. This giveaway will close on Wednesday, December 7, 2016. The winner will be chosen randomly and announced in the comments section of this post. Good luck!

***

Follow the Blog Tour

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10/21: Guest Post, Excerpt & Giveaway at More Agreeably Engaged
10/22: Review & Giveaway at Just Jane 1813
10/27: Review & Giveaway Savvy Verse & Wit
11/01: Excerpt & Giveaway at Half Agony, Half Hope
11/08: Guest Post & Giveaway at So little time…
11/10: Review & Giveaway at My Kids Led Me Back to Pride and Prejudice
11/11: Guest Post & Giveaway at Babblings of a Bookworm
11/15: Review & Giveaway at My Vices and Weaknesses
11/17: Guest Post & Giveaway at A Covent Garden Gilflurt’s Guide to Life
11/26: Excerpt & Giveaway at Margie’s Must Reads
11/30: Review & Giveaway at Diary of an Eccentric
12/01: Guest Post & Giveaway at From Pemberley to Milton

Disclosure: I received The Courtship of Edward Gardiner from the author for review.

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