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Sally didn’t care whether the WASP were civilians or soldiers.  Nor was she really concerned about the condition of the planes they flew.  WASP got advanced training and were paid to fly; that put being a WASP head and shoulders above anything she’d done so far except barnstorm with Tex.  “Not me!” she said.  “I won’t quit!  Any kind of flying beats anything else, any day of the week.”

(from Wings, page 17)

Karl Friedrich’s novel Wings:  A Novel of World War II Flygirls pays homage to the 1,074 women who graduated from the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) program, which operated from September 1942 to December 1944.  These women were civilians with pilot licenses who volunteered for training to deliver aircraft all over the country.  The U.S. Army needed their services because most of its pilots (male, of course) were fighting oversees in Europe and the Pacific.  They worked just as hard as any male pilot and oftentimes were better pilots, yet the U.S. government did not grant them the same benefits and did not award the WASP veteran status until 1979.

In Wings, Friedrich tells the story of Sally Ketchum, a young girl hoping to make a career in aviation.  Sally is rough around the edges, but it’s easy to understand where her anger and defensiveness come from, given that she grew up the daughter of a poor, alcoholic, and abusive farmer in East Texas.  She’s uneducated but bright, and the light of her life was Tex Jones, the boyfriend who taught her how to fly and how to love.  In the first chapter of the book, Sally’s life has come apart at the seams; all the fun she had barnstorming with Tex ends in a fiery crash that takes his life and forces her to return home to her father.

After her father’s death, Sally finds the letter inviting her to participate in the WASP program, and she heads to Avenger Field in Sweetwater, Texas, to begin her new life as a pilot.  She meets the beautiful, lively, and brusque Dixie, the intelligent Twila, and the snobbish Geri, and even though they see Sally at first as a “ragamuffin,” the girls become reluctant friends.  Sally also meets Beau Bayard, a flight instructor who is not nearly as adept as Sally at flying planes.  Despite their heated arguments, there is an attraction between them, but Sally doesn’t think she can love anyone like she loved Tex, whom she has placed on a pedestal that no one could ever hope to climb.  Meanwhile, she goes toe-to-toe with Ira Waterman, a ruthless attorney sent to Avenger Field by Congress to gather information about the WASP with the intention of disbanding the program.

Wings is a compulsively readable novel, with action in the skies, tension on the ground, a lot of heated dialogue, and a little romance.  Friedrich does a great job showing how the women in the WASP program were capable and ambitious and emphasizing the challenges they faced, from being forced to pay for their uniforms and room and board to dealing with men who believed the cockpit was no place for a woman.  The Army ordered these women to fly missions in weather that kept male pilots grounded, and there were reports of sabotaged planes and parachutes that kept the WASP on guard.  A handful of WASP lost their lives.

I found the story of the WASP program fascinating, and I admire the women who went against what society thought were respectable roles for them to do what they loved.  However, the characters lacked depth — the female characters were more stereotypes (the arrogant privileged girl, the flirty model with a big mouth, and the boyish girl with a chip on her shoulder) than real people.  I felt it difficult to connect with Sally and invest myself completely in her story.  She was always on the defensive in conversation, and she would go from being pleasant to shouting in the blink of an eye.  Her attitude got old after awhile, and even though I found the scenes where she was forced to use her natural talent as a pilot to get herself and others out of life-threatening situations entertaining, it seemed a little over-the-top that Sally — out of all the WASP in training — would continually find herself involved in near tragedies and always find a way out.   Yet no matter how much Sally and the other girls annoyed me, I found the book hard to put down.

The details of the WASP program and the flying of the aircraft is where Wings really shines.  I know nothing about airplanes and am not much interested in aviation; I wanted to read Wings because I had not heard of the WASP and am interested in all-things-WWII.  I can’t say whether Friedrich’s descriptions of the planes or Sally’s in-flight maneuvers are accurate, but it seems he has done his homework.  He does a good job balancing the technical terms with readability.  Overall, I’d recommend Wings for fans of WWII fiction who want to learn more about the contribution of women to the war effort, but they should be ready for more than just a history lesson.

McBooks Press would like to offer a copy of Wings to one lucky reader.  To enter, simply let me know in your comment that you are interested in reading the book.  Because the publisher is shipping the book, entries must be from readers with addresses in the U.S. or Canada.  This giveaway will close at 11:59 pm EST on Sunday, October 23, 2011.

**Please note that this giveaway is now closed**

Thanks to TLC Book Tours for having me on the blog tour for Wings. To follow the tour, click here.

Disclosure: I received a copy of Wings from McBooks Press for review purposes. I am an IndieBound affiliate and an Amazon associate.

© 2011 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

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Random House is generously offering 2 copies of The Countess:  A Novel of the Notorious Elizabeth Bathory by Rebecca Johns (IndieBound/Amazon) to my readers to celebrate the recent paperback release!

Was the “Blood Countess” history’s first and perhaps worst female serial killer? Or did her accusers create a violent fiction in order to remove this beautiful, intelligent, ambitious foe from the male-dominated world of Hungarian politics?

In 1611, Countess Erzsébet Báthory, a powerful Hungarian noblewoman, stood helpless as masons walled her inside her castle tower, dooming her to spend her final years in solitary confinement. Her crime—the gruesome murders of dozens of female servants, mostly young girls tortured to death for displeasing their ruthless mistress. Her opponents painted her as a bloodthirsty škrata—a witch—a portrayal that would expand to grotesque proportions through the centuries.

In this riveting dramatization of Erzsébet Báthory’s life, the countess tells her story in her own words, writing to her only son—a final reckoning from his mother in an attempt to reveal the truth behind her downfall. Countess Báthory describes her upbringing in one of the most powerful noble houses in Hungary, recounting in loving detail her devotion to her parents and siblings as well as the heartbreak of losing her father at a young age. She soon discovers the price of being a woman in sixteenth-century Hungary as her mother arranges her marriage to Ferenc Nádasdy, a union made with the cold calculation of a financial transaction. Young Erzsébet knows she has no choice but to accept this marriage even as she laments its loveless nature and ultimately turns to the illicit affections of another man.

Seemingly resigned to a marriage of convenience and a life of surreptitious pleasure, the countess surprises even herself as she ignites a marital spark with Ferenc through the most unromantic of acts: the violent punishment of an insolent female servant. The event shows Ferenc that his wife is no trophy but a strong, determined woman more than capable of managing their vast estates during Ferenc’s extensive military campaigns against the Turks. Her naked assertion of power accomplishes what her famed beauty could not: capturing the love of her husband.

The countess embraces this new role of loving wife and mother, doing everything she can to expand her husband’s power and secure her family’s future. But a darker side surfaces as Countess Báthory’s demand for virtue, obedience, and, above all, respect from her servants takes a sinister turn. What emerges is not only a disturbing, unflinching portrait of the deeds that gave Báthory the moniker “Blood Countess,” but an intimate look at the woman who became a monster.  (publisher’s summary)

To enter, simply leave a comment with your e-mail address. Since the publisher is shipping the books, this giveaway is open to U.S. addresses only. This giveaway will close at 11:59 pm EST on Sunday, October 16, 2011.

**Please note that this giveaway is now closed**

Disclosure: I am an IndieBound affiliate and an Amazon associate.

© 2011 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

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He picks up one of the boxes on the table this time, a polished-wood box with a swirling pattern etched into its lid.  The inside of the box is lined with white silk.  The scent is like incense, deep and spiced, and he can feel smoke curling around his head.  It is hot, a dry desert air with pounding sun and powder-soft sand.  His cheeks flush from the heat and from something else.  The feel and sensation of something as luscious as silk falls across his skin in waves.  There is music that he cannot discern.  A pipe or a flute.  And laughter, a high-pitched laugh that blends harmoniously with the music.  The taste of something sweet but spicy on his tongue.  The feeling is luxurious and lighthearted, but also secretive and sensual.  He feels a hand on his shoulder and jumps in surprise, dropping the lid down on the box. 

(from The Night Circus, page 239 in the ARC; the finished version may be different)

When I finished The Night Circus this morning, I had a hard time turning that final page and accepting that the few days I’d spent with this book were over.  It honestly took a lot of strength to keep myself from going back to the beginning and starting all over again.  I just did not want to leave the magical world that Erin Morgenstern created, and this comes from someone who isn’t much of a fantasy reader!

I don’t want to provide more than a basic summary of The Night Circus because it truly is something you must experience for yourself.  In the late 1800s, two aging magicians, Prospero the Enchanter and Alexander, train two young magicians to compete against one another in a challenge that remains vague.  But they didn’t expect their protégés, Celia, Prospero’s daughter, and Marco, plucked out of his lonely existence in an orphanage by Alexander, to fall in love.

The venue for the competition is Le Cirque des Rêves, The Circus of Dreams, which is an extraordinary circus that delights all of the senses.  It simply appears one day and disappears without warning.  It is open from nightfall to dawn, and what is contained within the marvelous black and white striped tents or along the white powered pathways is something you have to see to believe.  And with Morgenstern’s deft hand, you will see it.

The Night Circus is a book to be savored.  Morgenstern’s descriptions of the circus are so vivid and detailed that you almost feel as if you are part of all the excitement, and you will finish the book wishing and hoping that it will spring up in a field nearby so you can enjoy the sights and smells for real.  In fact, the circus is so brilliantly painted and feels so alive within the pages of the book that it almost becomes the main character.  The other characters, the creators of the circus, its performers, and its ardent followers, are just as interesting, and even thought they aren’t so developed that you know everything about them, you still feel like you know them enough.

Morgenstern has created a world that is magical and fantastical, yet it feels real, enabling someone like me who doesn’t normally enjoy fantasy novels to get lost within its pages.  There is something for everyone in The Night Circus:  passionate love, a coming-of-age story, eccentric characters, drama, and art, all wrapped up in a dreamy, fairy tale atmosphere.  Even though the romance wasn’t as well developed as I would have liked, I was able to go with the flow and not worry about it.  Like one of my favorite characters, Widget, Morgenstern is a wonderful storyteller, and I can’t wait to see what she has in store for us in the future.

If you’d like to know what it feels like to want to run away and join the circus, you’re in luck!  Doubleday is offering a copy of The Night Circus to one of my readers.  To enter, leave a comment with your e-mail address.  Because the publisher is shipping the book, you must have a U.S. address in order to win.  This giveaway will close at 11:59 pm EST on Sunday, October 16, 2011.

**Please note that this giveaway is now closed**

Disclosure: I received a copy of The Night Circus from Doubleday for review purposes. I am an IndieBound affiliate and an Amazon associate.

© 2011 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

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Penguin is generously offering 2 copies of What Came First by Carol Snow (IndieBound/Amazon) to my readers as part of a blog tour to celebrate the book’s release today!

First comes love, then comes marriage, then . . . things can get a little complicated.

Vanessa wants just one thing for her twenty-ninth birthday: an engagement ring from her longtime boyfriend, Eric. But when the ring turns out to be a mix CD and Eric turns out to be a guy who doesn’t want to get married or have children, Vanessa considers a new path to having a family.

When Wendy and her husband, Darren, couldn’t have children the old- fashioned way, a sperm donor seemed like the perfect solution. She never imagined she’d have out-of-control twins who’d drive her to cookie binges and scrapbooking while Darren escaped into the virtual world of computer games.

Single and career-driven, Laura didn’t need a man to have a baby – at least not one that she ever met. Thanks to an anonymous donor, she shares her life with her adored eight-year-old son, Ian. She’ll do anything for Ian – even fill their backyard with a bunch of noisy chickens. But the one thing Ian really wants is something Laura’s never been able to give him: a sibling.

Now, to grant Ian’s wish, Laura starts a search that will not only change her life but Vanessa’s and Wendy’s as well…  (publisher’s summary)

To enter, simply leave a comment with your e-mail address.  Since the publisher is shipping the books, this giveaway is open to U.S. addresses only.  This giveaway will close at 11:59 pm EST on Sunday, October 9, 2011.

**Please note that this giveaway is now closed**

Disclosure: I am an IndieBound affiliate and an Amazon associate.

© 2011 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

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My guest today on Diary of an Eccentric is Heather Lynn Rigaud, author of Fitzwilliam Darcy, Rock Star, a contemporary re-telling of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice.  If you desire an edgier, steamier take on Austen’s masterpiece, Fitzwilliam Darcy, Rock Star (check out my review) might be the book for you.  I’m always searching for unique takes on Austenesque novels, which many of you know are my guilty pleasure, and I was very curious about why Rigaud chose to turn Austen’s characters into rock stars.  I’m happy to welcome her here today to shed some light on that subject.  Please give a warm welcome to Heather Lynn Rigaud:

Hi Anna,

It’s nice to be here with you. It’s always pleasant to meet a fellow knitter and Jane Austen fan.

You’ve asked me the most popular question of my blog tour, which is “Why rock stars?” and I’ll admit is seems like a very strange idea. But I’ll be happy to write a bit about Fitzwilliam Darcy Rock Star and the thought process behind it.

When you first encounter the title, sometimes there’s a momentary tendency to pull back. Maybe even cringe. (It’s okay, I know) I think the reason is there is something showy and garish about Rock and Roll. Perhaps even something immature or loud. And if we know anything, it’s that Darcy is never garish or loud or immature. As Austen lovers, there is a crazy need to protect him from anything that might embarrass him. I get that and I share that feeling.

So let me put all your fears to rest, right here, right now. My Darcy is not immature or garish or showy or anything that might dull that Darcy glow. He’s proud, he’s aloof, he’s Darcy. When he’s on stage, he wears dark sunglasses and never speaks. When he does promotions, he’s polite to his fans, but ignores talk show hosts. Despite all the rumors to the contrary, he’s extremely professional in all of his behavior. He is, first and foremost, is a master musician and that is very Darcy.

Darcy’s band follows the Rock band tradition of having a friendly and outgoing frontman (Bingley) and a super-talented and silent guitarist. It’s likely that some of the public doesn’t even realize that Darcy’s in charge. They just hear Bingley talking, which let’s face it, is something Bingley does really well. (I kind of suspect that’s why Darcy keeps him around)

This was brought home to me all over again a Metallica concert I went to last week, where the singer and rhythm guitarist, James Hedfield, talked to the crowd, charming us all. Meanwhile the virtuoso guitarist, Kirk Hammett, never said a peep. He let his amazing guitar work do all the talking, and it was very expressive. This dynamic is not unusual. I can quickly think of 5 top-level bands set up like this and I’m sure you could too. (U2, Areosmith, Van Halen, Guns n’ Roses, Queen)

So lets get back to the question of ‘Why Rock Stars?’ The reason is that one of the things that is crucial to Austen’s story mechanics is that there has to be a reason why Elizabeth and Darcy are not a ‘proper’ match. In Pride and Prejudice, it’s the differences in their social class. Darcy is the grandson of an aristocrat, while Elizabeth’s mother’s side is still in trade. (We can tell from his mother being ‘Lady’ Anne) His wealth and property place him on a very different level from the Bennets, who are literally one heartbeat away from ruin. One of the things Darcy and Elizabeth need to overcome in the course of the story to be together is that class difference.

For my modern story, I wanted to recreate and update that difference. I needed a reason that Darcy and Elizabeth, on the surface at least, wouldn’t be obvious match. It’s harder in our society to find these differences than it was in Austen’s time, but fame is certainly something that would fit. My next question was how would Darcy be famous? He could be a rich CEO businessman, but that’s kind of boring. He could be a classical musician, but that’s been done. I wanted to try something that hasn’t been done before. Then I heard a song that was absolutely Darcy during that horrible time when he’s made his first proposal and Elizabeth has rejected him. That helped me to decide to make Darcy a rock star. It was new, it was risky, (because boy, the chance of it not working was pretty high) and I knew I could write it.

Darcy is famous, from a famous family. Elizabeth is a nobody from an average, unremarkable family. There’s some tension right there, but how to get them together? It occurred to me that a newer, up-and-coming band seeking fame could parallel a regency era lady seeking to improve her station through marriage. And just as in Pride and Prejudice Darcy felt he needed to protect his friend from a woman who just wanted his money and position, my modern Darcy would want to protect Charles from a woman who just wanted his fame. After all, can you think of a woman who’s famous just for the men she’s dated? I can. Several, in fact. It’s never a good situation.

My goal was to have a similar dynamic to Pride and Prejudice for my characters in which to interact. So, there’s my set up: Darcy and his band is rich and famous. Elizabeth and her band are not. Elizabeth wants to prove she’s good enough after being insulted by Darcy. And Darcy wants to protect his friends from the women’s ‘arts and allurements.’ We put that all into the fast-paced, high drama world of a rock band on national tour, and you’ve got Fitzwilliam Darcy Rock Star.

What do you think? Have I made my case for Rock Star Darcy, or are those shades of Pemberley being thus polluted? I am all eagerness to hear what you and your readers have to say. Thank you for having me here today.

Thanks, Heather!  It certainly is an interesting and unique take on the classic novel.

Are any of you interested in getting to know Mr. Darcy as a rock star?  If so, you’re in luck!  Courtesy of Sourcebooks, I have one copy of Fitzwilliam Darcy, Rock Star up for grabs.  To enter, simply leave a comment with your e-mail address.  [Warning: This book contains explicit sex, so please, no entrants under age 18.]  Because the publisher is shipping the book, this giveaway is open to readers with addresses in U.S. and Canada only.  This giveaway will close at 11:59 pm EST on Sunday, Oct. 2, 2011.

**Please note that this giveaway is now closed**

Disclosure: I am an IndieBound affiliate and an Amazon associate.

© 2011 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

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“So what are you going to do next, my boy?”

“Run away to sea.  I’ll take any boat that will have me,” said Harry, trying to sound enthusiastic.

“What a good idea,” said Old Jack.  “Why not play straight into Fisher’s hands?”

“What do you mean?”

“Just that nothing will please Fisher more than to be able to tell his friends that the street urchin had no guts, but then, what do you expect from the son of a docker whose mother is a waitress?”

“But Fisher’s right.  I’m not in his class.”

“No, Harry, the problem is that Fisher already realize he’s not in your class, and never will be.” 

(from Only Time Will Tell, page 47 in the ARC; finished version may be different)

Only Time Will Tell is the first installment in Jeffrey Archer’s multigenerational saga, The Clifton Chronicles.  The novel is set in Bristol, England, from 1919 to 1940 and centers on Harry Clifton, a young boy destined to follow in the footsteps of his father and uncle and work on the docks until a new world is opened up to him.  Harry has the gift of song, and when Miss Monday, the choir mistress, Mr. Holcombe, his elementary school teacher, and Old Jack Tar, a WWI hero and loner, join forces to get him accepted into a prestigious boarding school, his life is changed forever.  Harry’s mother, Maisie, works as a waitress and scrimps and saves to send her son to school and give him a better life.

Maisie’s sacrifices and the secret of Harry’s parentage are the main focus of Only Time Will Tell.  Harry has grown up thinking Arthur Clifton is his father and that he died in the war, but he begins to doubt that story when he does the math and realizes Arthur couldn’t possibly be his father if he died during the war.  Maisie knows the truth about Harry’s parentage, and a few people know the truth about Arthur Clifton’s death, but no one tells Harry anything.

While Harry is off at school befriending Giles Barrington, the son of the man who owns the shipping company where Harry’s father and uncle work and who knows what happened to Arthur Clifton, Maisie deals with countless personal tragedies and must make some tough decisions to continue Harry’s schooling.  At the same time, it looks as though England may go to war with Germany, and Harry must consider what this means for his future.

Archer deftly combines multiple viewpoints in Only Time Will Tell, giving Harry, Maisie, Giles, Old Jack Tar, Giles’ father Hugo, and Giles’ sister Emma the opportunity to drive the story.  Sometimes reading several years from one point of view only to go back in time to read the events of those same years through the eyes of another character can slow down the progression of the plot, but Archer uses each character to fill in the gaps of the story, not to reiterate what has already transpired.  I felt like I got to know each character well enough to care about them (or in the case of the villain, to hate him even more) and to understand their motivations.  Archer also has a talent for pacing, revealing crucial details here and there throughout and providing just enough action and tension so that they story never slows down.

Only Time Will Tell is a tad predictable in spots, but that didn’t prevent me from enjoying it; in fact, I couldn’t read it fast enough and stayed up well past my bedtime because I needed to know what happened.  Readers who like each book in a series to tie up loose ends and maybe give a little glimpse of what is to come will be disappointed because Archer ends with a cliffhanger and not much resolution with regard to the major plot points.  However, if you enjoy multigenerational sagas set during the World War II era, then you’ll speed through this one and be eagerly anticipating the second installment in the Clifton Chronicles just like I am.

Although I read a print copy, Macmillan Audio would like to offer the audio book of Only Time Will Tell to one of my readers.  The audio version is read by Roger Allam, and the first two chapters can be heard here.  To enter, leave a comment with your e-mail address by 11:59 pm EST on Sunday, September 25, 2011.  Because the publisher is shipping the audio book, this giveaway is open to readers with U.S. addresses only.

**Please note that this giveaway is now closed**

Disclosure: I received a copy of Only Time Will Tell from St. Martin’s Press for review purposes. I am an IndieBound affiliate and an Amazon associate.

© 2011 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

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I received an extra copy of this book, and I thought I would share it with one of my readers in honor of Book Blogger Appreciation Week.

When She Woke by Hillary Jordan (IndieBound/Amazon)

Hannah Payne’s life has been devoted to church and family, but after her arrest, she awakens to a nightmare; she is lying on a table in a bare room, covered only by a paper gown, and cameras are broadcasting her every move to millions at home, for whom observing new Chromes — criminals whose skin color has been genetically altered to match the class of their crime — is a new and sinister form of entertainment. Hannah is a Red; her crime is murder. The victim, says the state of Texas, was her unborn child, and Hannah is determined to protect the identity of the father — a public figure with whom she’s shared a fierce and forbidden love.

When She Woke is a stunning story about a stigmatized woman struggling to navigate an America of a not-too-distant future, where the line between church and state has been eradicated and convicted felons are released back into the population after being “chromed.” In seeking a path to safety in an alien and hostile world, Hannah unknowingly embarks on a path of self-discovery that forces her to question the values she has held true and the righteousness of a country that politicizes faith. (publisher’s summary)

To enter, the only requirement is that you must be a book blogger, since BBAW is all about celebrating book bloggers. Simply leave a comment, and make sure the e-mail address and blog URL fields are complete. This giveaway is open to book bloggers everywhere and will close at 11:59 pm on Sunday, Sept. 18, 2011.

**Please note that this giveaway is now closed**

**Enter my other BBAW giveaways by clicking the links: Finding Grace by Donna VanLiere, Only You by Deborah Grace Staley, The Angelic Way by Rami Shapiro, and Grace Helen Mowat and the Making of Cottage Craft by Diana Rees with Ronald Rees**

Disclosure: I am an IndieBound affiliate and an Amazon associate.

© 2011 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

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To celebrate Book Blogger Appreciation Week, I’m giving away several of the unsolicited review copies I’ve received since I started blogging. I am hoping that these books will find homes where they will be read and enjoyed. Here’s the book up for grabs today:

Grace Helen Mowat and the Making of Cottage Craft by Diana Rees with Ronald Rees (IndieBound/Amazon)

Cottage Craft has long held a strong reputation for its fine wool, dyed to the palette of the local landscape, and the fine craftsmanship of the people who weave and knit its quality materials.  Behind Cottage Craft is the story of a woman of vision and remarkable resolve.

Grace Helen Mowat looked upon traditional rural crafts — knitting, weaving, and rug hooking — as cash crops for the farm women of Charlotte County, New Brunswick.  In 1911, unmarried and with limited means, she commissioned a handful of women to make rugs according to her designs.  The Arts and Crafts movement was in full swing — the rugs sold quickly, and Cottage Craft grew into a homegrown business from its base in St. Andrews.  Since then, Cottage Craft has continued to grow, and now, three generations later, it attracts customers the world over.  (publisher’s summary)

To enter, the only requirement is that you must be a book blogger, since BBAW is all about celebrating book bloggers. Simply leave a comment, and make sure the e-mail address and blog URL fields are complete. This giveaway is open to book bloggers everywhere and will close at 11:59 pm on Sunday, Sept. 18, 2011.

**Please note that this giveaway is now closed**

**Enter my other BBAW giveaways by clicking the links: Finding Grace by Donna VanLiere, Only You by Deborah Grace Staley, The Angelic Way by Rami Shapiro**

Disclosure: I am an IndieBound affiliate and an Amazon associate.

© 2011 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

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To celebrate Book Blogger Appreciation Week, I’m giving away several of the unsolicited review copies I’ve received since I started blogging. I am hoping that these books will find homes where they will be read and enjoyed. Here’s the book up for grabs today:

The Angelic Way: Angels Through the Ages and Their Meaning for Us by Rami Shapiro (IndieBound/Amazon)

Humankind has been fascinated with angels — and angel-like beings — for thousands of years; they are one of the greatest spiritual phenomena ever. Humans have a subtle intuition of the sacred, and angels symbolize the way to it. Thus we have always adored angels and feared them, prayed to them and challenged them. Houses of worship were built and music composed to celebrate angels; countless artists carved their images in stone and painted them in oil. And since ancient times people have spoken and written about angels, from Zoroastrian teachers and Jewish prophets like Ezekiel and Zechariah to the Gospel authors of the New Testament. We are told of the cherubim stationed at the gate to the Garden of Eden, Jacob wrestling with an angel, the archangel Gabriel visiting Mary, Michael the archangel fighting the dragon, and the guardian angels of Islam watching over humans; but we also hear about the fallen angels like Satan, and the angel of death.

The Angelic Way illuminates the spiritual, philosophical, and psychological implications of angels, both heavenly and fallen, for readers and seekers of every faith or none. It offers an accessible history of angels in our varied religious and cultural traditions, an exploration of angelology through the ages, and a means to make sense of angels and the divine in today’s world. (publisher’s summary)

To enter, the only requirement is that you must be a book blogger, since BBAW is all about celebrating book bloggers. Simply leave a comment, and make sure the e-mail address and blog URL fields are complete. This giveaway is open to book bloggers everywhere and will close at 11:59 pm on Sunday, Sept. 18, 2011.

**Please note that this giveaway is now closed**

**Enter my other BBAW giveaways by clicking the links: Finding Grace by Donna VanLiere, Only You by Deborah Grace Staley**

Disclosure: I am an IndieBound affiliate and an Amazon associate.

© 2011 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

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To celebrate Book Blogger Appreciation Week, I’m giving away several of the unsolicited review copies I’ve received since I started blogging.  I am hoping that these books will find homes where they will be read and enjoyed.  Here’s the book up for grabs today:

Only You by Deborah Grace Staley (IndieBound/Amazon)

A charming romance about the lives and loves of people in a small Tennessee town. In the tradition of Debbie Macomber. “Hey, ya’ll. Dixie Ferguson here. I run Ferguson’s Diner in Angel Ridge, Tennessee. Population three hundred forty-five. It’s a picturesque town in the valley of the Little Tennessee River, established in 1785. In the early days, its first families–the McKays, the Wallaces, the Houstons, the Joneses, and, of course, the Craigs–staked their claims on hundreds of acres of the richest bottom land anyone had ever seen. After all the years I’ve spent behind the counter at Ferguson’s, I could probably tell ya’ll a story about near everyone in town. But we only have so much time, so I’ll narrow it down to just two for now. This is a story about coming home. It’s also a story about acceptin’ folks for who they are. You could say it’s a story about Josie Allen, a librarian, and Cole Craig, a handyman, but I say it’s a story about finding love where you’d least expect to.” (publisher’s summary)

This is a spiral-bound review copy, but I hope that won’t turn you off from wanting to read it.  To enter, the only requirement is that you must be a book blogger, since BBAW is all about celebrating book bloggers.  Simply leave a comment, and make sure the e-mail address and blog URL fields are complete.  This giveaway is open to book bloggers everywhere and will close at 11:59 pm on Sunday, Sept. 18, 2011.

**Please note that this giveaway is now closed**

Disclosure: I am an IndieBound affiliate and an Amazon associate.

© 2011 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

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