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August Break

I hope you all are having a wonderful summer!

I just wanted to let you know that, aside from two pre-scheduled reviews (The 26th of November by Elizabeth Adams on August 2, and What’s Past Is Prologue by Ann Galvia on August 9), I will be taking the month off from blogging.

My daughter is leaving for college at the end of the month, and there is still so much to do! I will be back with more reviews and author features after Labor Day!

Take care,

Anna

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I am thrilled to welcome Georgina Young-Ellis back to Diary of an Eccentric today to celebrate her latest release, Incandescent. You’re in for a treat today, dear readers, as Georgina is here today to tell you a little about the book, share an excerpt, and offer a giveaway. Please give her a warm welcome!

I love Jane Austen. I have loved her for decades. Long ago, it would never have occurred to me to write Fan Fiction, especially based on Jane Austen’s work—after all, it wasn’t even a thing until somewhat recently. Yet my first book, The Time Baroness, a romantic time travel novel, was written in homage to Jane Austen, so in a way, it was my first foray into Fan Fiction though I didn’t know it at the time. Since then, I’ve written three other books in that series, (the fifth on the way) and six actual JAFF (Jane Austen Fan Fiction) novellas.

Since I’m going to be starting a graduate program in Spanish Language and Literature in the fall, I decided I better get all the writing done that I want to do for the time being, as it will be two years, I’m sure, before I’ll have time to devote to it again. That brings me to Incandescent, my latest JAFF, just released April 28th. Here’s the Amazon blurb:

In this modern day twist on Jane Austen’s Persuasion, The Elliots are Hollywood Royalty – a family of actors going back three generations. Annie Elliot has been cast to play Elizabeth Bennet in a new movie adaptation of Pride and Prejudice that takes place during the Belle Epoque, circa 1910, with a multi-racial cast. But who will her Mr. Darcy be? As the two stories mix and intermingle on and off camera, hearts are broken, love is found, and diversity is celebrated.

Several years ago, I had the idea of turning Persuasion into a modern day story, with the characters as actors, making a Regency film of it while also living out the plot in real life. That then morphed into the actors making a film of Pride and Prejudice, while living out both novels in real life. The result is something I think is unique, romantic, and also a lot of fun. Here is how Chapter One of Incandescent starts out:

“Annie Elliot, the hottest young actress in Hollywood!” the papers screamed after the box office of her latest film broke records. At merely the age of nineteen, Annie had everything, or so said the press: the looks, the body, the talent…and the family. Did she believe it? Well, she couldn’t argue that she had the family. “Hollywood royalty,” they called the Elliots. No matter how many times, however, she tried to tell herself she would have had a successful career even without a famous grandfather, father, mother, and sister, she knew it wasn’t true. Okay, sure, if she didn’t have the talent, she wouldn’t have gotten as far as she had, but the average pounding-the-pavement-actor doesn’t even get the auditions without connections, and she had connections for days.

It was April in New York City. Awards season had come and gone. Annie had been nominated in the Best Actress category for all the major awards, for a film that had been released in the fall. She’d won the Screen Actors Guild Award, but not the other big ones. That was fine. Young actors had to pay their dues. Besides, she’d just been cast as Juliet in the Shakespeare in the Park production of Romeo and Juliet, and nothing was more prestigious for an actor, young or old, than to do Shakespeare in the Park at the open air Delacorte Theater in Central Park. Her father, Walter Elliot, who everyone, including his friends, now called Sir Walter because he’d won an Oscar playing Sir Francis Drake, had, over the course of his career, done Shakespeare in the Park several times, playing everything from Mercutio in R and J, to Prospero in The Tempest only recently. Her mother had once played Juliet there too, as well as Ophelia, Titania, and Lady Macbeth.

Annie had flown to New York for the audition, gotten the part right away, and was now staying in her parents’ loft in Soho. She loved the city. Maybe after the play was over, she’d stay for a few years and get her own apartment. It would be fun to be a New York actor for a change. Maybe even do Broadway.

On the day before rehearsals started, Annie picked up a copy of the Sunday Times. This was her guilty pleasure, something she used to see her grandfather do. In the age of electronic news, she still loved to get the Sunday paper: The Los Angeles Times when she was there, the New York Times here, spreading it out on the coffee table, a fresh bagel and a cup of coffee handy, and reading it from end to end. In the Arts and Entertainment section, a big article about Shakespeare in the Park jumped out at her, her name featured prominently. She skimmed through it. They made much of the fact that the late Susan Elliot’s daughter would be playing the title role in Romeo and Juliet, the role the beloved actress had once portrayed so beautifully. Annie set the article aside and took a big swig of coffee. Nothing like a little pressure!

Monday morning, she woke up with butterflies in her stomach. Instead of hopping on the train or grabbing an Uber, she walked from the loft to the Public Theater at Astor Place, where the cast would work until the director was ready to have them move to the Delacorte Theater. It was pretty far from Soho to the East Village, but the exercise would work off all that nervous energy. In fact, springtime in the city proved to be just the remedy. It had rained the night before and the air was fresh and cool. Trees were blooming everywhere and flowers in planters added splashes of color to a town which had been grey with winter for so long and was just now starting to come alive again.

She got to the theater right on time and the first person she spotted was her manager, Cynthia Russell, who waved at her from her seat among the few invited guests for this first read-through. Cynthia had been her mom’s manager too when she was alive. It had been about a month since they’d last seen each other in L.A. Annie went to her and gave her a big hug.

“Hi, my darling,” Cynthia said, “you look wonderful.”

Annie was wearing a pink, vintage dress with a white cardigan sweater, and lavender tights with a pair of black Doc Marten boots.

“Thank you, so do you,” which was the truth. Though in her fifties, Cynthia was well-preserved and in good shape, a handsome woman at any age.

“Have you met your Romeo yet?” Cynthia pointed out a young man, sitting shyly at the table where the other actors were gathering.

Annie knew her Romeo’s name, Frederick Wentworth, but that was all. Her mouth fell open when she saw him. Never had she seen a more beautiful man. He was a combination of a Paul Newman and Taye Diggs, if that were possible, with a chiseled jaw and startling eyes.

“That’s Frederick Wentworth?”

“I know. Handsome, isn’t he? His headshot doesn’t do him justice. If I weren’t a good thirty years older than he is…”

“Cynthia!” Annie snorted.

“I jest. I just met him, and he is extremely amiable, but, if I had a son, he would be his age. No, he’s safe with me.”

“Good to know, Cynth.” Annie winked at her. “See you after the reading.”

She went and took a seat opposite Frederick and he looked up and smiled. Their eyes met and locked.

“Hello,” he said softly.

“Hi,” she replied.

Then the director walked in. The cast had been given their script a few weeks before and Annie had memorized her lines, happy to see there weren’t too many cuts. People should not mess around with Shakespeare.

They went around the table and everyone introduced themselves. Frederick, it turned out, liked to be called Freddy. The director then talked for a few minutes about his vision for the production and the reading got under way. As Annie read her lines, she barely looked at the script, and neither did Freddy. The fact was, it was hard to look away from him. His gaze captivated her as his character spoke his first lines to Juliet, holding out his hand to her. She took it across the table. It was warm and strong.

“If I profane with my unworthiest hand his holy shrine,” he said, “the gentle fine is this: my lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand to smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.”

The sweet conversation between the two lovers-to-be continued. Though having just met, they would exchange their first kiss. Annie wondered, if she had been sitting next to instead of across from him, would he have brushed her lips with his?

The play built in intensity. The young teenagers, as the characters are supposed to be, fall immediately in love, and vow to be married, though, of course, their families are enemies and will never allowed it, as well as the fact that Juliet is to marry someone else. After Romeo is banished for killing Juliet’s cousin in retaliation for the murder of Romeo’s best friend, comes the scene of the lovers waking in the morning after spending the night together, knowing full well that Romeo must flee the town, and they might never see each other again. Their words of love at their parting felt unbearable to Annie. Then finally, of course, the two lovers die in the last moments of the play.

By the end of the reading, the other actors, the director, and everyone else present were in tears. Annie’s heart was pounding, her face hot. She felt as one with Juliet—that she had fallen in love at first sight, committed her life to her lover, and lost him, all in the course of two hours. While everyone composed themselves, Annie went to get a drink of water. Freddy was at her side a moment later.

“Are you all right?” he asked her. She looked up at him. His face was tender, concerned.

She smiled. “Yes. I didn’t expect the first reading to be so powerful.”

“It was, wasn’t it? You were wonderful.”

His clear, blue eyes, intense in contrast to his tawny skin, pierced her soul. “Thank you.” She had to look away for a moment. “So were you.”

Just then Cynthia hurried up to her. “Can I steal her for a moment?”

Annie was almost relieved as Freddy nodded and stepped away.

“Annie, that was amazing.” Cynthia gushed. “I have never seen a better Juliet! It was every bit as good as when your dear mother played her.”

“This was just a rehearsal,” Annie demurred. “Who knows how it will be when I’m finally on stage in front of an audience.”

“Oh, nonsense. You were born to play this role. And Frederick! My God, the chemistry between you!”

Heat rose to Annie’s cheeks again.

Cynthia observed her closely. “Be careful. It’s never a good idea to fall for your leading man.”

“I’m not going to fall for him!” Annie declared, but there was no use denying it. Freddy Wentworth was intoxicating. He was yet practically an unknown, though it turned out he had made a name for himself locally in some very good Off-Broadway productions. She had certainly never heard of him before he was cast by the Public Theatre for R and J, but had no doubt he was going to be big.

The first time they did the scene in Juliet’s bedchamber without scripts, Annie lost herself in the desire of her character and in Freddy’s passion. Suddenly, they were no longer acting. The director had asked them to create as sensual a moment as possible while still keeping it PG13, but they didn’t even have to try. From that moment on, every time they looked into each other’s eyes, Annie fell harder. But did Freddy feel the same? They didn’t talk much off stage. She was shy. He was reticent. But on stage, there were fireworks.

The show opened to previews, and the critics were ecstatic. “Elliot and Wentworth are magic together!” One paper cried.

“You feel you are intruding on an extremely intimate moment between two innocents, blissfully exploring their first act of love together, giving themselves over to each other wholly,” another enthused.

The cast went out after the show that night to celebrate. Freddy was at Annie’s side the whole time though they spoke little. When she finally decided to leave, he asked if he could share a cab with her.

“Do you live downtown?”

“No,” he replied with a grin.

Hope you enjoyed this excerpt! Please visit my website to see all my work—time travel and JAFF alike! www.georginayoungellis.com

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Wow, thanks so much for sharing, Georgina! I think this has got to be the most unique mashup I’ve seen so far, and I’m definitely going to have to get my hands on a copy. For those of you as intrigued as I am, you can purchase Incandescent on Amazon.

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About the Author

Georgina Young-Ellis

Georgina lives in Portland, Oregon with her husband who is an artist, writer, and teacher. They have a son who is a professional musician in New York City, where they all lived for eighteen years. She is a member of the Screen Actors Guild, and was a stage actress for many years. Born and raised in the Southwest, she went to school in New York City, graduating from New York University with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theater. She is also a screenwriter, journalist, film/theater critic and blogger.

Connect with Georgina: website | Facebook | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram: GYoungEllis

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Giveaway

Georgina is generously offering an ebook copy of Incandescent to one lucky reader. To enter, please leave a comment with your email address. We’d love to hear what most intrigues you about the book. This giveaway will be open through Sunday, May 20, 2018. The winner will be chosen randomly and announced in the comments section of this post. Good luck!

Thank you, Georgina, for being my guest today. It’s always a pleasure. Congratulations on your new book!

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Today I’m pleased to welcome Valerie Fox to Diary of an Eccentric for the blog tour for her chapbook, Insomniatic. Since it is National Poetry Month, I thought it would be great for Valerie to share a poem from the collection and what inspired it. Please give her a warm welcome!

My Daughter Listening to Christian Tetzlaff

My daughter fell asleep listening
to Christian Tetzlaff.
All 9-year-olds should experience such luxury.

I was disappointed that my daughter
mostly slumbered through
his Selections from Signs, Games

and Messages by György Kurtág, miniatures
that encompass a “unique world
of naked nerves,” multiple voices, tingly details.

Too tired I guess.
She was mildly attracted to the spaghetti strap
girl in front of her

seated in the balcony-right front row,
her lengthy hair and upper body
leaning into air

toward the emotive virtuoso, like she was his
Juliet and his hands were
signaling capitulation.

Jolted awake, finally, by the crowd’s cheers
my daughter faintly registered
Tetzlaff’s smiling encores–

his Paganini
his Bach.

About “My Daughter Listening to Christian Tetzlaff” (and Process)

Insomniatic contains poems that are dream-like or surreal, and also many that contain references to kinds of dreams and ways of being awake (or not). As I was combining poems for this chapbook, I wanted to include a wide variety of styles, but with this semi-thematic thread (of dreams and insomnia). The inspiration specifically for “My Daughter Listening to Christian Tetzlaff” was a real experience, not a surreal reverie or based on my own sleeping (or wakefulness). Rather, it is based mostly on observation of a specific scene.

I think of my poems almost entirely as fictional, made-up. But “My Daughter” is more overtly personal or even autobiographical. It also concerns works of art, in this case Tetzlaff’s extraordinary performances. We were watching him from the balcony, which suggested the scene from Romeo and Juliet. Much of what I write contains reactions to works of art. This habit reflects what I like to do and think about, and how art becomes a lens through which I view and try to understand the world.

Poems are like children. At least that’s what you hear poets say. I think comparing writings to children is natural when we are talking about that feeling or act of creation, or of surprise and discovery that comes about in that process, or even that desire to not give up on a writing (as hopefully we will not give up on any child).  So it felt nice to write something that actually included my daughter, and that she might in the future read and think of in a positive way—even a sentimental way. I wouldn’t mind that.

Thank you, Valerie, for sharing the poem and your inspiration with me and my readers. It sounds like a fascinating collection!

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About Insomniatic

Insomniatic is the newest poetry chapbook from Valerie Fox, author of The Roschach Factory and The Glass Book. These poems haunt and question, dream and wander, asking the reader to question what is a dream state and what does it mean to be awake.

“Insomniatic” (poems) asks the question: Who are we when we dream?

Buy Insomniatic on Amazon

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About the Poet

Valerie Fox

Valerie Fox’s books of poetry include The Rorschach Factory (2006, Straw Gate Books) and The Glass Book (2010, Texture Press). She co-wrote Poems for the Writing: Prompts for Poets with Lynn Levin. Bundles of Letters Including A, V and Epsilon (2011, Texture Press) is a collaborative book with Arlene Ang. “Scarecrow Lists of Failures and Grocery Items” (a collaboration with Ang) may be found here, at Thrush.

Her work has appeared in many journals, including Thrush, Painted Bride Quarterly, Hanging Loose, Apiary, West Branch, Sentence, and Qarrtsiluni. Originally from central Pennsylvania, she has traveled and lived throughout the world, and has taught writing and literature at numerous universities including Sophia University (in Tokyo) and currently at Drexel University (in Philadelphia).

For more about Valerie and her work, click here. To read more of her poems, click here.

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To follow the tour for Insomniatic, click the button below

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Source: Purchased

“Life is the art of drawing without an eraser,” Jack said in a contemplative tone and broke the silence.

“Who said that?” Lindsey asked.

“You did.”

(from Love Locks)

Those who know me well know that Hallmark’s romance movies are my guilty pleasure. I can watch the Hallmark movie marathons all weekend, and I’ve seen some of the movies multiple times. They aren’t Oscar-worthy movies, but they are just the thing when I need to de-stress and enjoy something lighthearted and predictable. (Ask my husband, and he’ll tell you that if I’m cranky, he’ll turn on Hallmark and let me be. :D) So when I saw that Hallmark has its own publishing company, I thought I’d give one of the books a shot.

I chose Love Locks by Cory Martin because I had stumbled upon the movie and watched the last hour of it, enjoying the Paris setting and the theme of second chances. I was curious if a book based on the movie would measure up, especially since I normally watch movies based on books and not the other way around.

Love Locks follows Lindsey, who was an art student and painter in Paris when she fell in love with Jack, the son of a hotel owner. The couple planned to commemorate their love by attaching a lock to the Pont des Arts bridge, but after their lock accidentally falls into the river and Jack doesn’t follow her back to New York as planned, she gave up painting and moved on with her life.

Twenty years later, Lindsey is divorced, the owner of an art magazine, and the proud mother of Alexa, who is following in Lindsey’s footsteps by studying art at the Sorbonne with Lindsey’s mentor, Hugo. Accompanying Alexa to Paris to help get her settled stirs up memories of Jack, and with some meddling by Hugo, Lindsey and Jack are reunited. While Lindsey and Jack ease back into a friendship of sorts and attempt to come to terms with their past, Lindsey has some tough choices to make about her magazine and must learn to accept that her daughter is an adult and eager to fall in love and go out on her own.

What surprised me the most about Love Locks was the writing. Martin brings the story to life in a way that the movie does not, giving readers a glimpse into the characters’ thoughts and fleshing out the story. Having seen the movie, I could easily picture the story in my mind, but I would’ve enjoyed the book regardless. The epilogue was a nice touch, giving readers a chance to see what happens to the characters after the movie ended. And there is a recipe at the end as well, which is an added bonus.

Love Locks was just what you’d expect from a book based on a Hallmark movie: lighthearted, humorous, and romantic. The characters were believable and endearing, and I couldn’t help but feel for Lindsey as I prepare to send my own daughter off to college in a few months. I would definitely give another book from Hallmark Publishing a try, especially since having seen the movie didn’t dampen my enjoyment of the book at all.

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Hello, dear readers! I am so excited to welcome Jenetta James back to Diary of an Eccentric today to celebrate the release of her latest novel, Lover’s Knot. When I saw that this book had been released, I bought a copy right away; I would’ve done that anyway, since I loved all of Jenetta’s previous novels and she is one of my favorite JAFF writers, but once you read the blurb for this one, you will be as excited as I am! I am anxiously waiting for my life to slow down a little bit so I can read at more than a snail’s pace. In the meantime, I am delighted to share this guest post from Jenetta, as well as a giveaway. Please give her a warm welcome!

The characters Jane Austen didn’t write

Thank you so much to Anna for having me to visit the blog today. I am a long time reader and it is a real pleasure to be here. For this guest post, I have decided to talk new characters.

It is always a bit unnerving introducing new characters to what is frankly a perfect cast of existing ones. After all, the population of Pride & Prejudice is so fabulous — how could one hope to improve on them, or even supplement them in a welcome manner? Today I’m talking about a few of the new faces who I have invented for Lover’s Knot, but who do not appear in Jane Austen’s original. I do hope that those readers who meet them in the story enjoy them. I have decided to look at three of them in particular.

Firstl, as with my previous stories, I have fleshed out the servant characters a bit. Jane Austen never did this and, of course, I am showing my modern sensibilities by doing so against her example. The story is told by Mr. Darcy himself and he is a man surrounded for much of the time by servants. In particular, he has a valet, called Stevenson. Stevenson is a long standing right hand man, whom Darcy trusts. His capabilities go substantially beyond his job description and his station and he is useful to his employer in solving the mystery with which he is faced. It is a trope of detective fiction that all detectives must have a side-kick and I trust that Stevenson fills those boots well and convincingly in this story.

Secondly, and most prominently, the plot of Lover’s Knot forced me to invent a local magistrate. The story is that there is a murder at Netherfield early in the story. Now, this is well before the establishment of the police as we know it and a private house in which a murder had taken place would not have been subject to the kind of intrusion by the authorities that we would expect now. However, the local constable and magistrate would inevitably have been present. On this basis, I have invented Mr. Allwood. I intend him to be not completely dissimilar to Mr. Darcy, although he is substantially older. A dour and observant local enigma, he benefits from standing apart from society. For good or ill, he suspects everyone. There may even be a hint that Mr. Allwood is the sort of man Mr. Darcy may have become absent finding the love of his life — Elizabeth.

Thirdly, I have invented a godmother for Mr. Darcy. She takes the form of an all-seeing society lady named Mrs. Protheroe. Mrs. Protheroe is known for her parties and her enormous social network. She is therefore a powerful contrast with Darcy and in their differences, they are surprisingly close. She has an important function in the plot of Lover’s Knot, which I shall not give away here. But more than that, I have always felt that Mr. Darcy is somewhat undersupplied with family and family friends in canon. The formidable Mrs. Protheroe is my attempt to change that.

There are others, but these are the characters who jump out at me. I do hope that they are liked and that they are believable additions. Who are your favourite “non-canon” characters in JAFF and why?

Thanks, Jenetta, for introducing us to your original characters. I can’t wait to meet them! I always find myself enjoying the non-canon characters. I read JAFF because I don’t want to say goodbye to my favorite characters, and the new additions tend to add some surprises on the journey to the happily ever after. Thanks for being my guest, and congratulations on your latest book!

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About Lover’s Knot

A great love. A perplexing murder. Netherfield Park — a house of secrets.

Fitzwilliam Darcy is in a tangle. Captivated by Miss Elizabeth Bennet, a girl of no fortune and few connections. Embroiled in an infamous murder in the home of his friend, Charles Bingley. He is being tested in every way. Fearing for Elizabeth’s safety, Darcy moves to protect her in the only way he knows but is thwarted. Thus, he is forced to turn detective. Can he overcome his pride for the sake of Elizabeth? Can he, with a broken heart, fathom the villainy that has invaded their lives? Is there even a chance for love born of such strife?

Lover’s Knot is a romantic Pride & Prejudice variation, with a bit of mystery thrown in.

Buy Lover’s Knot on Amazon (also available for free through Kindle Unlimited)

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About the Author

Jenetta James

Jenetta James is a mother, writer, lawyer and taker-on of too much. She grew up in Cambridge and read history at Oxford University where she was a scholar and president of the Oxford University History Society. After graduating, she took to the law and now practices full-time as a barrister. Over the years, she has lived in France, Hungary, and Trinidad as well as her native England. Jenetta currently lives in London with her husband and children where she enjoys reading, laughing, and playing with Lego. She has written, Suddenly Mrs. Darcy and The Elizabeth Papers as well as contributed short stories to both The Darcy Monologues and Dangerous to Know: Jane Austen’s Rakes and Gentlemen Rogues.

Connect with Jenetta James on Facebook | Twitter

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Giveaway

Jenetta has selected a lovely giveaway package where one lucky winner will receive a Pride & Prejudice scarf, a Kindle cover and paperback copies of all five of her JAFF books. You must enter through the Rafflecopter link.

Terms and conditions:

Readers may enter the drawing by tweeting once each day and by commenting daily on a blog post or review that has a giveaway attached to this tour. Entrants must provide the name of the blog where they commented.

The winner will be randomly selected by Rafflecopter and the giveaway is international. Good luck!

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March 29 My Jane Austen Book Club/ Guest Post & Giveaway

March 30 Savvy Verse & Wit / Guest Post & Giveaway

March 31 Liz’s Reading Life / Book Review & Giveaway

April 1 My Vices and Weaknesses/  Excerpt Post & Giveaway

April 2 Of Pens and Pages / Book Review & Giveaway

April 3 So Little Time /  Guest Post & Giveaway

April 4  Austenesque Reviews / Author Interview & Giveaway

April 5 From Pemberley to Milton /  Excerpt Post & Giveaway

April 6 Babblings of a Bookworm /  Book Review & Giveaway

April 7 More Agreeably Engaged / Book Review & Giveaway

April 8 My Love for Jane Austen / Guest Post & Giveaway

April 9 Diary of an Eccentric /  Guest Post & Giveaway

April 10 Laughing with Lizzie /  Excerpt Post & Giveaway

April 11 Margie’s Must Reads / Book Review & Giveaway

April 12 Just Jane 1813/ Author Interview & Giveaway

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Hello, dear readers! Today’s guest is Debra-Ann Kummoung, who is here for the first time with an excerpt from her Pride and Prejudice variation, Falling for Elizabeth Bennet, and a very generous giveaway. I do hope you enjoy the excerpt; Debra-Ann provided me with a few, and I really thought this one would grab your attention! Please give her a warm welcome:

Hello! First of all, I would like to give a big thank you to Anna for having on her website/blog — Diary of an Eccentric, it is a pleasure to be here. We all know and love Pride and Prejudice and we each of us imagine Darcy and Elizabeth in our own unique ways. I have read many variations of Pride and Prejudice but I wanted to do something different, something that had not been done before. What if it was not pride or class or family that kept Darcy and Elizabeth apart? In my book Falling for Elizabeth Bennet, Elizabeth has a health condition. The big question is, will Darcy turn away from Elizabeth or will he still love her? This is my debut novel and one that comes from the heart.

I would also like to recognize my husband, Jeff, who has supported this book and has believed in me and is the inspiration for Darcy in my book.

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An excerpt from Falling for Elizabeth Bennet, courtesy of Debra-Ann Kummoung

After a few moments, Darcy looks up at Wickham with tears in his eyes, and his voice thick with emotion. “Wickham, where is my wife?” Wickham replies in a hushed whisper, “Bedlam.” Darcy and Richard both gasp in horror. Wickham asks, “Darcy, who is your wife?” Darcy looks at Wickham in surprise. “Wickham, you know my wife. You met her in Hertfordshire. She is the former Miss Elizabeth Bennet.” Darcy and Richard watch as Wickham’s mouth drops in shock and horror, and re replies, “Darcy, I would never have recognized Miss Elizabeth.”

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About Falling for Elizabeth Bennet

While visiting his friend Mr. Charles Bingley, Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy makes the acquaintance of Miss Elizabeth Bennet, a lively and intelligent young lady sitting in the corner at a local assembly. Darcy discovers that Elizabeth has a secret. Will this secret drive them apart or will Darcy be able to overcome Elizabeth’s secret and find the love he’s dreamed of?

Buy: Amazon

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About the Author

Debra-Ann Kummoung

I am a first time author. I love Pride and Prejudice and fell in love the 1995 mini-series. I read Pride and Prejudice in high school and fell in love with Mr. Darcy back then. Life continued and I forgot about Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet until I happened to see the mini-series on TV and decided to revisit the book and then discovered all the variations out there. I decided that I could write a book and as I was writing the plot for Falling for Elizabeth Bennet, I discovered that I had married my own Mr. Darcy who also has a dash of Colonel Fitzwilliam too!

By day, I am an Executive Assistant and by evening I plot what can next befall Darcy and Elizabeth. I am currently working on my next book.

My husband and I are raising our 3 German Shepherds — Belle a white shepherd, Jasmine a black shepherd and Fitz our newest family member, a sable shepherd.

Connect with Debra-Ann: Facebook | Twitter | Instagram: debraannkummoung | Website

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Giveaway

Debra-Ann is generously offering two prizes to my readers: a signed copy of Falling for Elizabeth Bennet and a $15 Amazon gift card. There will be a total of two winners. This giveaway is open internationally and will close on Sunday, March 18, 2018. To enter, please leave a comment with your email address and which prize you’re entering for, and let us know what intrigues you most about the book. The winners will be chosen randomly and announced in the comments section of this post. Good luck!

Thanks for being my guest today, Debra-Ann, and congratulations on your new book!

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Oops…

I’ve heard from several of you that the email notification of today’s blog post has a broken link. When I published the post, it posted with the wrong date, and when I updated it with today’s date, it didn’t send an updated email with the correct link.

My apologies! If you want to read my mini-reviews of this year’s Austen-themed Christmas reads, click here.

Happy New Year! Stay tuned for my Top 10 from 2017 tomorrow!

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