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Archive for the ‘holocaust’ Category

heirlooms

Source: Review copy from Caitlin Hamilton Marketing
Rating: ★★★★☆

In the last light, the fields outside gleam. She must finish her letter, so she can post it at the next station. There is much she cannot write her parents and her sister Allegra about: not the round-ups in Paris, for instance, not her new awareness of the gradations and varieties of fear — one that numbs, another that makes her sharp and quick, certainly not Alain’s and Jean’s involvement with the Resistance.

(from Heirlooms)

Rachel Hall’s Heirlooms is a collection of interconnected short stories that takes readers to France, Israel, and the United States during and after World War II, following a single family as it navigates the fear, devastation, and loss of war and the evils of the Holocaust. The collection opens with Lise going to her sister-in-law’s deathbed, secretly pleased at the prospect of raising her niece, Eugenie, as her own. Then Lise and Eugenie, escape Saint-Malo to avoid having to register as Jews, and thus begins the family’s journey from place to place, leaving behind their lives, their belongings every time they are forced to flee.

Each story stands on its own, but putting them into a single volume makes for a richer, more profound tale that spans generations. Hall brings to life such interesting characters — from Simone, a woman in the Resistance who dares to dream of a future after the war, to Magda, a Holocaust survivor who takes great pains to hide the numbers on her arm — and it was fascinating to see how they were connected to the Latour family. The stories also touch on the immigrant experience, with Eugenie becoming “Genny,” and the ways in which a family’s history is passed on.

The story “Heirlooms” was particularly touching and reminiscent of Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried in listing the things the family had lost to the war, from furniture and businesses to their language and their loved ones, and how secrets and desires cannot be left behind.

“Sometimes,” Lise will say, “I find myself wondering where something is–an owl brooch set with turquoise eyes from my sister or a particular square platter. And then I know: It is gone.” She shakes her head, laughs at her forgetfulness.

For the Latour family and others who have been displaced by war, the heirlooms they pass on are these stories of survival and their ability to rebuild their lives and move on, to even laugh again. I didn’t realize how attached I’d grown to these characters until I teared up on the last page, when the story comes full circle and acknowledges the sad fact of life that not all of the questions about our pasts will be answered. Heirlooms is a hauntingly beautiful tale of love and loss over the course of generations, touching upon what it means to be family and how the pains of the past can impact the future.

Disclosure: I received Heirlooms from Caitlin Hamilton Marketing for review.

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tea-time

Source: Personal library
Rating: ★★★★★

There were so many ways to survive, even after you’d died.

(from “Tea Time”)

“Tea Time” is a short story set in the ruins of Berlin in the days after World War II. After reading Tiffani Burnett-Velez’s powerful novella, A Berlin Story, I knew I had to check out this story, and I wasn’t disappointed.

The story is set in the remains of the apartment building at 500 Friedrichstrasse. Maria, a Holocaust survivor, is having tea with her friend Greta — nettle tea served out of a rusty tin can and heated on a stove fueled by pieces of broken furniture. The older woman is the first friend Maria has had in years, which is probably why Maria puts up with her crazy babbling and smiles in the midst of so much sorrow. And when Russian soldiers enter the apartment, it quickly becomes obvious just how much Maria depends on Greta’s positive attitude to maintain her hold on sanity.

In the midst of their conversation, Burnett-Velez gives readers a glimpse of Berlin and the women fighting to survive in the aftermath of the war, and bits and pieces of Maria’s past are revealed to add depth to the story and help readers understand all that she has endured. I finished reading “Tea Time” in less than half an hour, and I was satisfied with the abrupt ending even though I wasn’t ready for the story to be over. The final few lines pack a punch and made it a story I won’t soon forget. I can’t wait to read more from Burnett-Velez.

Disclosure: “Tea Time” is from my personal library.

© 2016 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

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I’m thrilled to spotlight Jeannette Katzir’s new novel, Footprints in the Forest, on Diary of an Eccentric today. I’ll be reading it soon, but while you wait for my review, Jeannette is generously offering an ebook copy to the first 10 readers to comment on this post (more information below)! I’ve been eagerly anticipating this novel since reading Jeannette’s memoir, Broken Birds, which is about her experiences as the child of a Holocaust survivor.

Book Summary

favorite-attempt-2To an Eastern European holocaust survivor the time difference between 1940 Poland and 1948 Brooklyn New York is unquestionably 8 years, but time is insignificant to Chana. To her, angry voices outside her Brooklyn brownstone apartment door drag her back to Poland, where tall, shiny booted Nazi soldiers, with swastikas on their sleeves, storm into your home, dripping with hatred and entitlement.

On this day, those voices cause her to run to the kitchen, fling open the drawer and grab a sharp knife. She won’t go without a fight.

It’s 1940, and with little more than a few hours warning Chana leaves behind her mother and younger sister, slithers beneath a barbed wire fence and escapes the Baranavichy ghetto with her older brother. She has no idea where she’s going, or what will be asked of her, but she knows they are to join a band of forest dwelling partisans. There she learns how to shoot a gun, plant bombs and keep away from the lecherous fellow freedom fighters who now see her as a blossoming young woman. She also learns about death, perseverance and love.

There is a concurrent story line about Chana and her brother’s lives after the war. Poland doesn’t want their kind to return home, so they leave Eastern Europe and journey to New York, where they begin life anew. Chana is a budding artist, who paints what she remembers from her time in the forest. She is also a young woman, a young woman in search of her beshert or soul mate. But finding love means sacrifices and Chana feels she isn’t willing to sacrifice anything more.

Footprints in the Forest features dual storylines about the same person; one who is young, fighting to live and learning about love and life. The other is about a young woman and choices that life demands her to make.

Check out Footprints in the Forest on Goodreads | Amazon

About the Author

portraitI am the second child of five children born to two Holocaust survivors. Footprints in the Forest is my second book in this genre. My first book, Broken Birds, the Story of My Momila, received positive reviews, and was spotlighted by Jesse Kornbluth of Head Butler and The Huffington Post. “Broken Birds is self-published, and I’ve never read anything like it,” were just a few of his complimentary words. I live in Los Angeles and am currently in the process of writing a new book, one which is not about the Holocaust.

Giveaway

Jeannette is generously offering an ebook copy (pdf or mobi) to the first 10 readers to comment on this post. Please be sure to include your email address and which format you’d prefer in your comment, and I will make sure Jeannette receives your information. This giveaway will close after the 10 copies have been claimed.

Stay tuned for my review of Footprints in the Forest!

© 2016 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

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A Moment Forever Cover LARGE EBOOK

Source: Review copy from author
Rating: ★★★★★

The profile of her grin was as awe inspiring as the impressive bombers themselves, and it was then he truly knew Lizzy Renner was special, different from any other woman he knew. She was a brilliant beacon of light in a dark world and an ingénue, ready and anxious for the next chapter of her life.

(from A Moment Forever)

A Moment Forever is a beautifully crafted novel by Cat Gardiner about a wartime romance that was so much more and a young woman determined to solve the mystery behind a handful of photos and letters that threaten to dig up long-buried secrets. In 1992, 24-year-old Juliana Martel inherits Primrose Cottage in Brooklyn, New York, from her great uncle Will, who simply walked out of the home in 1950 and never returned. Upon entering the home, dusty and unchanged from the past 50 years, Juliana finds a burned letter in the fireplace and a shrine to a beautiful, vivacious young woman named Lizzy, who obviously stole her uncle’s heart and appears to be connected to his reasons for disappearing.

Still struggling to come to terms with the recent death of her father and the fact that she was abandoned by her mother when she was a child, Juliana has lost faith in true love. But when she stumbles upon the World War II-era letters and photos in her uncle’s footlocker, she is sure that Will and Lizzy’s romance is a love story for the ages and proof that a deep, abiding love is possible. A writer for Allure magazine, Juliana sets out to tell Will and Lizzy’s story and soon uncovers a tale of all-consuming passion, unimaginable evils, and overwhelming loss. Juliana’s investigation leads her to Jack Robertson of Newsday, whose connections could help her piece together the puzzle but whose determination to let sleeping dogs lie could stand in her way.

A Moment Forever is a breathtaking novel that takes readers on an emotional roller coaster as it shifts between the 1940s romance of debutante Lizzy Renner and her flyboy, Will Martel, and Juliana’s journey 50 years later that opens up old wounds while healing the holes in her own life. Gardiner is a fantastic storyteller, and this novel is perfectly paced. She reveals bits and pieces of information throughout, so you think you know what’s going to happen, and then there’s another twist and turn. I had a hard time putting the book down. I laughed, I cried, I simply loved it. The characters are all endearingly flawed and skillfully developed, and there is so much to ponder about secrets, betrayals, and forgiveness. And I love how Gardiner plays homage to Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, and not just in the names of her characters. It was fun to see a little something Austenesque here and there.

A Moment Forever is not a book you merely read; Gardiner ensures you actually live the story — from the overindulgence of Long Island’s Gold Coast to the wartime excitement in the Big Apple, from the airfields and USO dances and the fashions of the ’40s to the solemnity of Paris 50 years after the roundup of its Jewish residents for deportation. There are so many layers to this story, and I never wanted it to end. It definitely will make my Best of 2016 list and ranks among my all-time favorite WWII romances.

Disclosure: I received A Moment Forever from the author for review.

© 2016 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

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Open Road Media is celebrating the international ebook release of Fragments of Isabella: A Memoir of Auschwitz by Isabella Leitner (which I will be reviewing in the coming months) with an international ebook giveaway for my readers.

fragments of isabella coverThe deeply moving true account of a young Jewish woman’s imprisonment by the Nazis at the Auschwitz death camp.

On May 29, 1944, the day after Isabella Katz’s twenty-third birthday, she, her family, and all the Jews in the ghetto in Kisvárda, Hungary, were rounded up by Nazi storm troopers, packed into cattle cars, and deported to Auschwitz. There, Dr. Josef Mengele, the so-called Angel of Death, scrutinized the family and decided who would live—for a time—and who would die. Isabella and three of her sisters waged a daily battle to survive, giving one another strength, courage, and love, promising themselves that they would cheat the crematoriums and end each day alive.

Thirty years after she escaped from the Nazis, Isabella wrote this powerful and luminous memoir. Hailed by Publishers Weekly as “a celebration of the strength of the human spirit as it passes through fire,” Fragments of Isabella has become a classic of holocaust literature and human survival.

This ebook features rare images from the author’s estate.

FIND FRAGMENTS OF ISABELLA ON:

Amazon | Apple | Barnes & Noble | Google | Kobo | Goodreads

GIVEAWAY

Open Road Media is generously offering 5 ebook copies of Fragments of Isabella to my readers. This giveaway is open internationally and will close on Sunday, July 3. To enter, please leave a comment with your email address and let me know why you want to read the book. The winners will be chosen randomly and announced in the comments section of this post. Good luck, and as always, thanks for visiting!

© 2016 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

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FRONT COVER The Seven Year Dress KINDLE(1) copyI am thrilled to announce the release of Paulette Mahurin’s latest novel, The Seven Year Dress. I became a fan of Mahurin’s in 2012 when I read The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap. I loved Mahurin’s strong characters and ability to set the scene, so I was excited to learn about The Seven Year Dress, which I will be reading and reviewing this summer.

In the meantime, I’d like to share with you a little about Paulette and her new release, and she is generously offering a giveaway to my readers.

BOOK BLURB

One of the darkest times in human history was the insane design and execution to rid the world of Jews and “undesirables.” At the hands of the powerful evil madman Adolf Hitler, families were ripped apart and millions were slaughtered. Persecution, torture, devastation, and enduring the unthinkable remained for those who lived. This is the story of one woman who lived to tell her story. This is a narrative of how a young beautiful teenager, Helen Stein, and her family were torn asunder, ultimately bringing her to Auschwitz. It was there she suffered heinous indignity at the hands of the SS. It was also there, in that death camp, she encountered compassion, selfless acts of kindness, and friendship. Written by the award winning, best selling author of His Name Was Ben, comes a story of the resilience of the human spirit that will leave you thinking about Helen Stein and The Seven Year Dress for years to come after the last page is shut.

“Mahurin skillfully intertwines fact into fiction in this story of death and survival, of hate and ultimately love. The brutality as Jews were isolated and persecuted; the horror of life in the concentration camps – all come into sharp focus rich with historical detail.” — Carol Bodensteiner author of Go Away Home

GIVEAWAY

Paulette is kindly offering one Kindle copy of The Seven Year Dress to my readers. To enter, please leave a comment with your email address telling me what intrigues you most about Paulette’s novels. This giveaway will close Wednesday, June 8. The winner will be chosen randomly and announced in the comments section of this post.

AUTHOR BIO

Paulette Mahurin lives with her husband Terry and two dogs, Max and Bella, in Ventura County, California. She grew up in West Los Angeles and attended UCLA, where she received a Master’s Degree in Science.

While in college, she won awards and was published for her short-story writing. One of these stories, Something Wonderful, was based on the couple presented in His Name Was Ben, which she expanded into a fictionalized novel in 2014. Her first novel, The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap, made it to Amazon bestseller lists and won awards, including best historical fiction of the year 2012 in Turning the Pages Magazine. Her third novel, To Live Out Loud, won international critical acclaim and made it to multiple sites as favorite read book of 2015.

Semi-retired, she continues to work part-time as a Nurse Practitioner in Ventura County. When she’s not writing, she does pro-bono consultation work with women with cancer, works in the Westminster Free Clinic as a volunteer provider, volunteers as a mediator in the Ventura County Courthouse for small claims cases, and involves herself, along with her husband, in dog rescue.

Profits from her books go to help rescue dogs from kill shelters.

You can learn more about Mahurin’s novels on her Amazon page.

© 2016 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

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tasa's song

Source: Review copy from Caitlin Hamilton Marketing
Rating: ★★★★☆

As she drew out the deepest of notes and boldest of chords, from lightly melodic to sharp and unyielding, and the song asserted its melancholic voice, she felt her tears fall, unrestrained, down her cheeks.

(from Tasa’s Song)

Quick summary: Tasa’s Song spans the years 1933-1947 and follows Tasa Rosinski, whose peaceful life in Eastern Poland is torn apart by war. Linda Kass, inspired by her mother’s childhood, tells the tale of a young Jewish girl whose passion for music and the violin, the happy memories of her parents, and the love of her cousin, Danik, help her stay strong as the war leaves her without a home and forces her fractured family underground.

Why I wanted to read it: I have a weakness for World War II novels, especially those set in Europe and with a strong female character in the lead.

What I liked: Kass opens the novel with Tasa’s family having to run from the approaching Germans and then takes readers back in time, when Tasa’s father was so sure that the political turmoil following the rise of Hitler would leave their village and their lives unaffected. Kass does a fantastic job developing the characters of Tasa and Danik as they leave their small village for an education in Brody and the warm home of Frau Rothstein and then are brought back together by the war and find solace in their love for one another. Shortly after Germany declares war on Poland, Tasa’s village and the surrounding area become part of the Ukrainian Republic, and Kass shows the confusion and the chaos over the course of the war as control of the area frequently changes hands between the Germans and the Soviets.

What I disliked: The novel opens with a bang, but quickly backtracks to Tasa’s childhood and then moves forward chronologically, and that slowed the pace a bit. There also was a bit too much description in spots, particularly at the beginning, but somewhere around page 60-70, I finally felt invested in the characters, and the pace picked up. It didn’t prevent me from enjoying and appreciating the novel, especially since I really enjoyed Kass’ writing overall. It might’ve just been my mood at the time, so I’m so glad I kept on reading!

Final thoughts: Tasa’s Song shows the various changes that occurred in Europe in the years before the war and how signs of trouble brewing were visible but not always taken seriously. The novel emphasizes everyday life in wartime, how people became immune to the sounds of the fighting after a time, how they waited for months or years to receive letters from loved ones, and the moments of hope that shone through the dark clouds of loss. Despite all that Tasa endures, she never gives up, never stops fighting, and never stops hearing the music inside of her. She is definitely a character I won’t soon forget.

Disclosure: I received Tasa’s Song from Caitlin Hamilton Marketing for review.

© 2016 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

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hidden halos

Source: Review copy from author
Rating: ★★★★☆

Sophia had always heard her grandmother express confusion over how so many people could fall prey to something so radical as Nazism. Indeed, from an outsider’s point of view, it did seem unthinkable. Being in the midst of such indoctrination, however, Sophia had begun to understand how some had come to believe it, how some wanted to believe it. Even being a foreigner who did not agree with Nazism in the slightest, Sophia could not deny the chill of patriotism in the broadcasts.

(from Sophia’s War: Hidden Halos)

[Please note that this book is the fourth in a series set during World War II.  It is not a standalone book, and while my review will not contain spoilers for the fourth book, there could be spoilers from the earlier books.  Check out my reviews of book one, Sophia’s War: The End of Innocence, book two, Sophia’s War: Lies and Allies, and book three, Sophia’s War: Stalemate]

Quick summary:  Sophia’s War: Hidden Halos opens in November 1940. Sophia is still living in her deceased great aunt’s home in Germany, having assumed Marelda’s identity so she can continue running the library Marelda worked so hard to build. Sophia’s relationship with her cousin, Diedrich, is still strained, and he continues to spend weeks working in Berlin while she remains at home alone. She has cut ties with Adrian — the Wehrmacht war photographer whose friendship was increasingly becoming more — because of Diedrich, and when she finds it too painful to be so close to Adrian without being able to really be with him, she thinks it might be time for her to finally go back home to Virginia. The fact that the villagers have too much on their minds in the midst of the war to visit the library gives her an excuse to leave — never mind the fact that Diedrich wants her gone. And if being an American living in Nazi Germany under an assumed identity wasn’t dangerous enough, Sophia’s new reason for staying could be deadly.

Why I wanted to read it: I enjoyed the previous books in the series, so I can’t stop now!

What I liked: It’s obvious that Stephanie Baumgartner has done extensive research about life in Nazi Germany, and it has enabled her to show how life in a small German village changed (in big ways and in so many small ones as well) during the course of the war. With Sophia being an outsider, she has a different perspective on Nazism, which enables her to see things that the Germans may not and keeps her at arm’s length from the Nazi ideology. I like that Sophia is a bit innocent and impulsive, but she is also strong and firm in her Christian beliefs, which means she cannot just sit around and watch when the Nazis’ talk finally becomes action. I still can’t figure out Diedrich, with his moments of tenderness before he turns cold again, and that adds a layer of mystery to the novels.

What I disliked: I think Sophie’s War: Hidden Halos is a solid addition to the series, but it is a bit quieter than the other volumes. However, I think that’s important as this installment is more of a turning point for Sophia, where she needs to take stock of her options and ultimately take some kind of action. There isn’t a lot of back story in these novels, so it’s a good thing that readers now have the opportunity to read them all at once.

Final thoughts: The decision Sophia makes in Sophia’s War: Hidden Halos is an important one, and it seems like the next books will really take things up a notch. I have all but the last book in the series on my side table waiting to be read, and while I can’t wait to see what happens next, it’s a series that I want to savor. I’m enjoying watching Sophia’s character evolve as life in Nazi Germany takes a more sinister turn, and I like that I have no idea how Sophia is going to fare as the war begins to take a bigger toll on Germany. Baumgartner does a great job effecting a satisfying ending while making readers want to immediately crack open the next book.

Disclosure: I received Sophia’s War: Hidden Halos from the author for review.

© 2015 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

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jars of hope

Source: Review copy from IWPR Group
Rating: ★★★★☆

Irena thought of something her father had told her.  “If you see someone drowning,” he had said, “you must jump in and save them, whether you can swim or not.”

“The children are hurting the most,” she decided.  “I have to give them a helping hand.”

(from Jars of Hope)

Quick summary: Jars of Hope: How One Woman Helped Save 2,500 Children During the Holocaust is a children’s picture book written by Jennifer Roy and illustrated by Meg Owenson that tells the story of Irena Sendler, a social worker in Poland during World War II who helped smuggle around 2,500 children out of the Warsaw Ghetto.  Roy explains how Sendler helped the children escape, how she saved the lists of their names, and how she survived the war herself.

Why I wanted to read it: Several years ago, my daughter and I watched the Hallmark Hall of Fame movie The Courageous Heart of Irena Sendler, and of course, we were fascinated by her story.  I’m also a fan of Roy’s since reading Yellow Star, her Aunt Sylvia’s Holocaust survival story, and meeting both Roy and her aunt at a book festival a few years ago.

What I liked: I applaud Roy for introducing Sendler to young readers and emphasizing how ordinary people can do extraordinary things in the face of evil.  The book is age-appropriate, showing the danger Sendler and the Jewish families faced without going into much detail.  Owenson’s illustrations are detailed and vibrant, using color to denote the warmth of family and the cold and desolation Sendler faced in prison.  I appreciated the author’s notes at the end that briefly wrap up Sendler’s story and explain Roy’s inspiration for the book.

JarsofHopebyJenniferRoyinterior10

Jars of Hope, page 10 (Capstone Young Readers)

What I disliked: The book only scratches the surface of Sendler’s story and makes it difficult for readers to feel connected to Sendler, but that is understandable given that it is short and intended for young children.

Final thoughts: Jars of Hope is a beautiful story of courage, love, hope, daring, and survival.  To think that one women had a hand in saving thousands of children during the Holocaust is inspirational and still brings people hope decades later.  It is important to remember people like Irena Sendler, who selflessly gave all they had, sometimes even their lives, to do what was right.  It also is important that children are introduced to these unsung heroes, and Jars of Hope is a book for parents and children to read and discuss together.

Disclosure: I received Jars of Hope from IWPR Group for review.

© 2015 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

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the travels of daniel ascher

Source: Review copy from Other Press
Rating: ★★★☆☆

The plane rose above the clouds, the ocean disappeared.  Perhaps that was what becoming an adult was, emerging from the clouds, leaving behind the sweet half-light of childhood, coming out into the blinding clarity of a truth you haven’t asked to know.

(from The Travels of Daniel Ascher)

Quick summary:  The Travels of Daniel Ascher by Déborah Lévy-Bertherat, translated from the French by Adriana Hunter, follows Hélène, a 20-year-old archeology student living in her great-uncle Daniel’s Paris apartment.  Hélène remembers Daniel’s antics at family gatherings over the years, acting out the travels that formed the basis of the young adult adventure series he writes under the pen name H.R. Sanders.  Hélène wasn’t as enthralled with Daniel’s stories as the other children and never read The Black Insignia series.  However, when a friend from school discovers that she is related to his favorite author, Hélène grows increasingly interested in her mysterious great-uncle, but all she knows is that he’s really Daniel Ascher and was adopted by her family as a child when his parents were deported during the Nazi occupation of Paris during World War II.  Hélène pieces together the fragments of her great-uncle’s life and stumbles upon a secret that could tear her family apart.

Why I wanted to read it: I’m always intrigued by wartime stories and secrets.

What I liked: I liked Daniel for his complexity, and I was fascinated by his ability (or necessity) to navigate different personae.  He was the only character I grew to like over the course of the novel, and the only character I felt was fully developed.

What I disliked: The writing style kept me at arm’s length from the story, particularly the run-on sentences, the lack of quotation marks around the dialogue, and the abrupt ending to the chapters.  Aside from Daniel, I didn’t really care for any of the characters, but in the end, the story was really about him anyway.  I must admit that I struggled at times to finish the book, but in the end, I continued because it was so short (less than 200 pages), and I wanted to know what happened to Daniel.

Final thoughts: Overall, I thought The Travels of Daniel Ascher was interesting, particularly the way the layers of Daniel’s story were peeled back and his secrets were revealed.  I’m not sure if the issues I had with the writing style had anything to do with the translation, and while these issues made finishing the novel a challenge at times, I’m glad I plowed through to the end.  I was satisfied with how Daniel’s story was wrapped up and impressed with how Lévy-Bertherat creatively illustrated the challenges faced by Holocaust survivors, particularly children, in navigating the post-war world on their own.  Daniel’s coping mechanisms were both fascinating and heartbreaking, and even if I didn’t love this novel, Daniel is a character I won’t easily forget.

Disclosure: I received The Travels of Daniel Ascher from Other Press for review.

© 2015 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

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