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Archive for the ‘book spotlight’ Category

Today is a special day, dear readers! Jennifer Joy is here to reveal the cover of the fifth and final book in The Merton Mystery Series: The Remarkable Miss Darcy.

Before we get to the blurb and the cover, Jennifer has a treat to celebrate the completion of the series. The Honorable Mr. Darcy (book 1) will be free in all Amazon stores from March 20-24, and The Indomitable Miss Elizabeth (book 2) will be 99 cents from March 19-26. So if you haven’t started the series yet, it will be a great time to do so!

Now, back to The Remarkable Miss Darcy. First, here is the blurb:

Darcy sees a little girl. Tanner sees a princess. He sees a remarkable woman.

Georgiana Darcy has grown up — and she has two older brothers who take her protection so seriously, she fears she is doomed for a life of dull solitude. However, one chance encounter with a young man from her past could set her on a path of adventure and romance … if only her dear family would let her.

Michael Nelson is everything Georgiana remembers him to be: hard-working, honest, and handsome. He fills his days chasing after criminals and uniting divided families. Anything to avoid feeling the void of loneliness and his lack of family.

When Georgiana’s dearest friend is kidnapped at a crowded ball, Michael and Georgiana become partners in the search to find her and restore peace to Darcy House. But before calm, there comes a storm, and their discoveries do not go unnoticed by their unknown enemy…

The Darcys face the greatest test to their family bond yet in this fifth and final book in The Meryton Mystery Series, a sweet romance-suspense variation of Jane Austen’s timeless classic, Pride and Prejudice.

Doesn’t that sound exciting? I love stories where Georgiana comes into her own, and throw in a mystery, and I’m doubly excited!

Now for the moment you’ve all been waiting for:

What a gorgeous cover! I think it depicts Georgiana perfectly, innocent but a little adventurous, too. What do you think?

The Remarkable Miss Darcy will be up for pre-order soon and will go live on March 21, so you won’t have to wait long!

In the meantime, Jennifer is generously offering 4 ebook copies of The Remarkable Miss Darcy to my readers. To enter to win a copy, please leave a comment with your email address. This giveaway will be open through Friday, March 22. The winners will be chosen randomly and announced in the comments section of this post. Good luck!

And thank you, Jennifer, for being my guest today! It’s an honor to be invited to share the cover and jump-start the release celebration. Congratulations!

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Today I’m delighted to spotlight Karen M Cox’s first audiobook, I Could Write a Book, which is a variation of Jane Austen’s Emma set in Kentucky during the 1970s. I had the honor of taking part in the blog tour in 2017 when the book was first released, and I absolutely loved it. (Feel free to check out my review.)

To celebrate its release as an audiobook, I invited Karen to share her playlist for the novel. Please give her a warm welcome!

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Hello everyone! And thank you, Anna, for inviting me to stop in at Diary of an Eccentric to celebrate the release of my first audiobook, I Could Write a Book, narrated by Emily Rahm.

I Could Write a Book was a story that was several years in the making. I started it soon after finishing Find Wonder in All Things, thinking it would be the next stop on my “Jane Austen in the 20th Century” journey. It wasn’t, as it turned out, because I had other stories banging on the inside of my head that had to burst forth. But finally, in September 2017, I Could Write a Book made its way to ebook and print formats.

I became interested in audiobook production early last year and put two of my titles, I Could Write a Book and Son of a Preacher Man on ACX to look for the perfect narrators. I had already decided to wait for a narrator that I thought was just right for the stories, and if it happened, that was great, but if not, I’d try again another time. I’d nearly given up when I heard Emily’s audition. She was very nearly perfect!

Audiobooks are a natural extension of my writing process, I think. I’ve used music as a “muse-enhancer” for years and make playlists for most everything I write. It isn’t so much that I write to music (I find it too distracting.) Rather I use the music to delve deeper into a character or scene, help me flesh it out a bit more.

Plus, playlists = fun!

I Could Write a Book’s playlist was probably the easiest one I’ve made so far. Many of the songs are from Me Decade. The 1970s, no matter what one might think about the hairstyles or the fashions, were good years music. I was a child and early adolescent during that decade (born in 1965) so I remember a lot of the songs playing on the radio.

I Could Write a Book’s playlist is also the longest I’ve created—45 titles strong. Some songs suggested scenes to me: Perry Como’s “Home for the Holidays” sets the stage for a Christmas party at Donwell Farms; “Love Train” (the O’Jays) tells us Emma’s mindset when she is in full match-making mode; and “Junior’s Farm” by Wings could be playing in the background at George Knightley’s Donwell strawberry party. Sometimes it’s the lyrics that speak to me; sometimes the music just sets a scene’s mood.

Of course, there are a couple of great representatives of the whole story: “I Could Write a Book” as sung by Harry Connick, Jr. from the When Harry Met Sally soundtrack has a friends-to-lovers vibe that’s perfect for the book, and “You’re My Best Friend” by Queen is another example.

A couple of song titles are mentioned specifically in scenes from the book: Stevie Wonder’s “Superstition” is playing when George arrives to help Emma watch their toddler nephew and colicky niece and realizes she’s got it all in hand. “Color My World” by Chicago is playing while Emma broods over “losing” George.

What surprised me most, though, was how many of these songs informed characters’ personalities and actions for me. For those of you familiar with the music of the time, consider Emma’s predictable existence deftly described in “Another Day” by Wings, or George’s swoon-worthiness as sung by Karen Carpenter in “Close to You.”

Or, can’t you just see the mysterious Frank Churchill arriving to the beginning riff of “Gimme Shelter” on his way to shake up little Highbury? Or poor Jane Fairfax at her piano, wistfully singing “What I Did for Love”?  Obviously, Emma and George have to dance to Clapton’s “Wonderful Tonight.” And Emma and George’s love story is traced through several songs: “Sister Golden Hair” (America), “I’m Not in Love (10cc), “Wild World” (Cat Stevens), “Show Me the Way” (Peter Frampton), and Harry Connick Jr.’s “It Had to Be You”, to name a few.

I hope you all will enjoy the audiobook for I Could Write a Book. While you’re waiting for an audiobook credit, or maybe in between listening to the chapters, be sure to check out the playlist and see if you can spot the characters in the music.

Spotify Playlist

Note: On YouTube, I sometimes choose a live version for a playlist—for the energy, or the arrangement—or just if I like the live rendition better. I love live music!

YouTube Playlist

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About I Could Write a Book

A Modern Variation of Jane Austen’s Emma (For fans of romantic comedy, coming of age, historical romance, and Southern fiction)

“Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever and rich…” Thus began Jane Austen’s classic, a light and lively tale set in an English village 200 years ago. Yet every era has its share of Emmas: young women trying to find themselves in their own corners of the world.

I Could Write a Book is the story of a self-proclaimed modern woman: Emma Katherine Woodhouse, a 1970s co-ed whose life is pleasant, ordered, and predictable, if a bit confining. Her friend George Knightley is a man of the world who has come home to fulfill his destiny: run his father’s thriving law practice and oversee the sprawling Donwell Farms, his family legacy in Central Kentucky horse country.

Since childhood, George’s and Emma’s lives have meshed and separated time and again. But now they’re adults with grown-up challenges and obligations. As Emma orchestrates life in quaint Highbury, George becomes less amused with her antics and struggles with a growing attraction to the young woman she’s become.

Rich with humor, poignancy, and the camaraderie of life in a small, Southern town, I Could Write a Book is a coming of age romance with side helpings of self-discovery, friendship, and finding true love in the most unlikely places.

Listen to a sample/Buy on Audible

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About the Author

Karen M Cox is an award-winning author of five novels accented with history and romance. She also loves writing short stories and has contributed to four Austen-inspired anthologies.

I Could Write a Book is her first audiobook.

Karen was born in Everett, WA, but now lives in a quiet little Central Kentucky town with her husband, where she works as a pediatric speech pathologist, encourages her children, and spoils her granddaughter.

Connect with Karen: WebsiteAmazon Author PageAll Karen’s Spotify PlaylistsKaren’s You Tube Channel (videos, playlists, etc.)

If you would like bits of authorly goodness in your inbox each month (updates, sales, book recommendations, etc.) sign up for her News & Muse Letter. She loves to hear from readers, so don’t be shy. Contact her through social media, her website, or on-line stores.

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About the Narrator

Originally from Dallas, Texas, Emily Rahm is an actress residing in New York City with her husband, Kendall, and her dog, Monroe. She loves to read, so narrating was a natural extension of her literary affinities and her acting skills. Her favorite movie is The Princess Bride, and her favorite ice cream flavor is Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough. You can find her at her website, on Twitter, and on Instagram (emkrahm).

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Nicole Clarkston recently introduced me to Leena Emsley, who narrated These Dreams for her, and I had the pleasure of interviewing Leena about all things audiobook-related. Please give her a warm welcome!

Hi, Leena! Can you tell us a little about yourself? How did you become an audiobook narrator?

I live in the UK, in the beautiful county of Northumberland. I come from a family of actors. My grandparents performed, my parents met on the stage and I was running around theatres from a young age. I went to drama school, but decided it was more fun as a hobby so devoted all my spare time to it and performed for many years on stages from Edinburgh to Berlin.

I gave up the stage when I had my children and have home schooled for almost 10 years. They are now teenagers and need me less, so I started to look for something I could do from home, and was drawn to find something that allowed me to indulge my old passion. I began doing voluntary audio work, took a training course for voice narrators, and signed up to ACX.

Can you describe the process of narrating a book? I know nothing about how it’s actually done, so any or all details would be fascinating to me. How do you go about differentiating between all the different characters/voices? What preparation is involved? Where do you record the book, etc.?

The first step is to read the book, know the story and get a feel for the characters. If there are particular accents required, I research the accent. In These Dreams there are several Portuguese characters. I was fortunate to have the help of Nicole’s Portuguese friend, Rita, who very kindly recorded phrases for me. She has also very kindly refrained from throwing her hands up in horror at how badly I managed to reproduce them! There is a balance between accuracy and performance. In the end, performance takes precedence, so long as I manage a flavour of the accent.

For characters with similar accents, I rely on their character differences to clue me in to their voices. Well drawn characters jump out the page. Mostly it comes down to intonation. For instance the snake Reginald (spoiler!) just has to have a languid tone, as opposed to his pompous staccato father. I do my best to differentiate between characters, sometimes successfully, sometimes not.

Leena Emsley

I record in a small booth my husband made for me. It does a good job of screening me from most outside noises, though I have to stop for planes, high wind and lawn mowers! I love my little booth. It feels like I enter a new world and I get totally wrapped up in the story.

What did you like best about narrating Nicole’s books?

I love Nicole’s writing! Not a word is wasted, there is pace and drama, her characters are well drawn and you feel their emotions. I am always moved by human compassion, and my favourite moment was when Elizabeth meets Amália. It reduced me to tears and required a pause in recording!

The Earl of Matlock and Lady Catherine were the most fun to narrate. It was great to let rip with the stiff upper lip, starchy accents, and so wonderful that their vulnerabilities were brought out, too.

What are some other books you’ve narrated?

My first book with ACX was Leslie Diamond’s Particular Intentions. It was my introduction to JAFF, and as a Jane Austen fan, I was immediately attracted. I am currently working on her sequel Particular Attachments. They are both Pride and Prejudice variations, with the sequel following Georgiana’s story. I have done several books books by Regina Puckett, as well as a detective story and steam punk adventure.

Thank you so much, Leena! I really enjoyed learning more about audiobook narration, so much so that I think this year might be time for me to give them another try!

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Giveaway

Nicole is generously offering two codes for each of her audiobooks, These Dreams and London Holiday. The codes are for the U.S. and U.K. only. To enter, please leave a comment with your email address, and let us know which book you’d prefer (you can enter for both, but can only win one) and whether you’d like a U.S. or U.K. code. This giveaway will be open through Sunday, January 13, 2019. The winners will be chosen randomly and announced in the comments section of this post. Good luck! And a big thanks to Nicole for setting up the interview with Leena and for the very generous giveaway!

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I’ve had the pleasure of leafing through Rachel Dodge’s Praying with Jane: 31 Days Through the Prayers of Jane Austen, and it couldn’t have been released at a better time, with the holidays coming soon and the Jane Austen fan in your life looking for something new and different!

The introduction sums up the book perfectly: “This book is broken down into three sections, one for each of Jane’s prayers, with ten devotions per prayer.” You might not have known that Jane wrote three prayers herself, or that they were preserved by her dear sister, Cassandra.

Praying with Jane is as beautiful as Jane’s prayers, with tidbits about her life and religious upbringing, quotes from Scripture, an invitation to prayer with questions to ponder, and a prayer to close out each day’s devotion. Dodge even draws connections between the devotions and Austen’s novels. It’s the perfect book for Austen fans to gain a deeper appreciation of Jane and grow stronger in their own faith. While I have not read the book cover to cover, I plan to keep it on my nightstand for a closer study in those rare quiet moments.

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About the Praying with Jane

Daily Encouragement for Your Soul through the Prayers of Jane Austen

For more than two hundred years, Jane Austen and her novels have charmed readers from around the world. While much has been written about her fascinating life, less is known about Jane’s spiritual side. In this beautiful 31-day devotional, Miss Austen’s faith comes to life through her exquisite prayers, touching biographical anecdotes, and illuminating scenes from her novels. Each reading also includes a thematically appropriate Scripture and a prayer inspired by Jane’s petitions.

May this journey into Jane Austen’s life of faith and prayer ignite and deepen your own relationship with the Father who loves you.

Click here for more information and to buy your copy!

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About the Author

Rachel Dodge

Rachel Dodge teaches college English and Jane Austen classes, gives talks at libraries, teas, and Jane Austen groups, and is a writer for the popular Jane Austen’s World blog. She makes her home in California with her husband, Robert, and their two young children.

Connect with Rachel on Twitter | Facebook | Website

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Follow the Blog Tour (there are giveaways at several blogs!)

October 31 – Praying with Jane, My changed Relationship with Jane, Jane Austen’s World

November 1 – Praying With Jane by Rachel Dodge,  So Little Time, So Much to Read!

November 2 – Praying With Jane: 31 Days Through Prayer (Review and Giveaway)Laura’s Reviews

November 3 – Praying With Jane: 31 Days Through Prayer by Rachel Dodge, Burton Book Review

November 4 – Blog Tour: Praying With Jane: 31 Days Through Prayer by Rachel DodgeBLOGLOVIN

November 5 – Guest Post: Praying With Jane by Rachel Dodge and Book Giveaway!, Jane Austen in Vermont

November 6 – Calico Critic

November 7 – A Bookish Way of Life

November 8 – Diary of an Eccentric

November 9 – Becoming

November 10 – My Jane Austen Book Club

November 11 – My Love for Jane Austen

November 12 – Laughing with Lizzie

November 13 – Faith, Science, Joy … and Jane Austen

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Thanks to Bethany House for sending me a copy of Praying with Jane and for inviting me to be part of the blog tour!

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Karen White’s New York Times bestselling hardcover The Night the Lights Went Out was released in paperback on March 27. Penguin Random House has invited me to give away a copy to one lucky reader.

KAREN WHITE, the New York Times bestselling author of over 20 beloved novels, has given her devout readership a new type of story – now in paperback.

With a plot worthy of Shonda Rhimes and a cast of characters made for Desperate Housewives’ Wisteria Lane, THE NIGHT THE LIGHTS WENT OUT (Berkley Trade Paperback Reprint; March 27, 2018; $16) brings a glinting new edge to White’s signature fusion of complicated family relationships, evocative prose, and picturesque southern locales.

Set in the gilded realm of Sweet Apple, Georgia, THE NIGHT THE LIGHTS WENT OUT achieves a magnetic sense of place, and with good reason—it is the first novel White, the “Queen of southern fiction” (Huffington Post), has set in her own community, the affluent suburbs of Atlanta.

White says: “I was sitting at a stop sign in my town behind a large white SUV and the license plate read YERSERV. . . and the whole Atlanta tennis­­–suburban mom–thriller idea came to me. . . . I realized perhaps for the first time that my hometown had a past and a story to tell.”

In THE NIGHT THE LIGHTS WENT OUT, recently divorced Merilee Talbot Dunlap moves with her two children to Sweet Apple, Georgia. It’s not her first time starting over. But her new beginning isn’t helped by an anonymous local blog that reveals for the whole town the scandalous affair that caused her marriage to fail. And Merilee’s new landlord, the proud, irascible, Atlanta born-and-bred 93-year-old Sugar Prescott, certainly isn’t helping.

But off Sugar’s property, Merilee finds herself swallowed into Sweet Apple’s most elite ranks—its inner circle of wealthy school moms—thanks to her blossoming friendship with the belle of the town, Heather Blackford. But behind the tennis whites, shiny SUVs, and immaculate women, lurk generations of secrets and resentments. And Merilee quickly learns that, in a town where appearance is everything, sins and secrets can be found in equal measure in the dark woods on Sugar’s property, and within the gated mansions of her newfound friends . . .

THE NIGHT THE LIGHTS WENT OUT is what would happen if ABC’s Revenge followed the machinations of Southern PTA moms instead of Hamptons elite.  For readers of Dorothea Benton Frank, Mary Alice Monroe, and Pat Conroy, this novel delivers everything her readers love and more.

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About the Author

Karen White
Photo Credit: Marchet Butler

Karen White is the New York Times bestselling author of more than twenty novels, including the Tradd Street series, The Night the Lights Went OutFlight PatternsThe Sound of GlassA Long Time Gone, and The Time Between. She is the coauthor of The Forgotton Room with New York Times bestselling authors Beatriz Williams and Lauren Willig. She grew up in London but now lives with her husband and two children near Atlanta, Georgia.

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Giveaway

Penguin Random House is generously offering a paperback copy of The Night the Lights Went Out to one lucky reader, U.S. only. To enter, leave a comment with your email address. This giveaway will close on Sunday, April 22, 2018. The winner will be chosen randomly and announced in the comments section of this post. Good luck!

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I have a treat for you today, dear readers! John Kessel’s latest novel, Pride and Prometheus, has just been released, and the publicist is kindly offering a hardcover giveaway for my U.S. readers.

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About Pride and Prometheus

Pride and Prejudice meets Frankenstein as Mary Bennet falls for the enigmatic Victor Frankenstein and befriends his monstrous Creature in this clever fusion of two popular classics.

Threatened with destruction unless he fashions a wife for his Creature, Victor Frankenstein travels to England where he meets Mary and Kitty Bennet, the remaining unmarried sisters of the Bennet family from Pride and Prejudice. As Mary and Victor become increasingly attracted to each other, the Creature looks on impatiently, waiting for his bride. But where will Victor find a female body from which to create the monster’s mate?

Meanwhile, the awkward Mary hopes that Victor will save her from approaching spinsterhood while wondering what dark secret he is keeping from her.

Pride and Prometheus fuses the gothic horror of Mary Shelley with the Regency romance of Jane Austen in an exciting novel that combines two age-old stories in a fresh and startling way.

Buy: Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound

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About the Author

John Kessel

Photo Credit: John Pagliuca

Born in Buffalo, New York, John Kessel’s most recent book is the new novel Pride and Prometheus. He is the author of the earlier novels The Moon and the Other, Good News from Outer Space and Corrupting Dr. Nice and in collaboration with James Patrick Kelly, Freedom Beach. His short story collections are Meeting in Infinity (a New York Times Notable Book), The Pure Product, and The Baum Plan for Financial Independence.

Kessel’s stories have twice received the Nebula Award given by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, in addition to the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award, the Locus Poll, and the James Tiptree Jr. Award. His play “Faustfeathers’” won the Paul Green Playwright’s Prize, and his story “A Clean Escape” was adapted as an episode of the ABC TV series Masters of Science Fiction. In 2009 his story “Pride and Prometheus” received both the Nebula Award and the Shirley Jackson Award. With Jim Kelly, he has edited five anthologies of stories re-visioning contemporary short sf, most recently Digital Rapture: The Singularity Anthology.

Kessel holds a B.A. in Physics and English and a Ph.D. in American Literature. He helped found and served as the first director of the MFA program in creative writing at North Carolina State University, where he has taught since 1982. He and his wife, the novelist Therese Anne Fowler, live and work in Raleigh, NC.

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Giveaway

The publicist is kindly offering a finished hardcover edition of Pride and Prometheus to one lucky reader. This giveaway is open to readers with U.S. addresses only (sorry!) and will close on Sunday, February 25, 2017. To enter, please leave a comment with your email address, and let me know what interests you most about the book. The winner will be chosen randomly and announced in the comments section of this post. Good luck!

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Copy of Copy of FB cover

Ginger Monette’s Pride and Prejudice variations set during the Great War — Darcy’s Hope ~ Beauty from Ashes and Darcy’s Hope at Donwell Abbey (click for my reviews) — were among my favorite reads in both 2016 and 2017. I’m delighted to announce that those of you who haven’t read them yet can now purchase them in a single volume: The Darcy’s Hope Saga.

Ginger is here today to talk about the books, so please give her a warm welcome!

ginger-monette

Ginger Monette

What exactly is the Darcy’s Hope Saga?

The Saga retells Pride & Prejudice but is set during the era of Downton Abbey. It’s a single ebook volume that includes two full-length novels: Darcy’s Hope ~ Beauty from Ashes and Darcy’s Hope at Donwell Abbey.

Readers can enjoy their beloved characters in a storyline that is familiar, yet very fresh and different.

What inspired you to catapult Jane Austen’s famous Fitzwilliam Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet from the early 1800’s to the early 1900’s?

Downton Abbey! It was remarkable to me how little British culture had changed from the Regency Era to the Edwardian Era. Darcy could have dined with Lord Grantham at Downton Abbey with little change in decorum. I was also fascinated at how the war affected everyone’s lives and how wealthy English families offered their lavish homes as hospital facilities during WW1.

I began to imagine Darcy and Elizabeth’s “explosive” relationship unfolding on the Western Front. Then asked, what if Darcy had his own wartime tragedy that required him to be hospitalized at a country home like Matthew Crawley? I’m thrilled that the resulting Darcy’s Hope Saga has been such a big hit among fans of both Pride & Prejudice and Downton Abbey.

Did the stories require any research? If so, what kind?

This was one of those topics that the more you read, the more you realize how much you don’t know. I devoured nurse-assistant diaries, a soldier’s diary, memoirs of two orderlies, books on surgery, war wounds, hospital administration, and a LOT more. Then I watched hours of documentaries about everything from battles, to the food and uniforms of British soldiers. I studied six hours a day for nine months and found the history fascinating and the people inspiring!

How were they inspiring?

Machine guns, poison gas, airplanes, and tanks made their debut in WWI inflicting destruction and horrific wounds on an unprecedented scale. Men lived in squalid trenches and saw their comrades dismembered and slaughtered on a daily basis, yet they remained cheerful and self-sacrificing.

And everyone did something to aid in the war effort. Hundreds of women volunteered as nurse’s aides, others wrote letters, sent care packages, and knitted socks. Men too old to serve as soldiers became stretcher-bearers and ambulance drivers. They fashioned splints from scrap metal, turned church halls into hospitals, and emptied bedpans. These small acts of kindness repeated over and over made an enormous difference. As a result, I am challenged to be cheerful amidst trying circumstances and to offer my own small acts of kindness even when they seem insignificant.

Did your research inspire any of your scenes?

Absolutely. First, I allowed the characters to be molded by the culture and the war itself — just like the real people I read about. I cast Elizabeth Bennet as nurse-assistant, which was a common role for high bred women during the war years. Similarly, I made rich young landowner Fitzwilliam Darcy a captain in the army. Though the saga is first and foremost a romance, much of the richness of the story comes from the hero and heroine both being deeply affected by their experiences during this turbulent time.

There are other elements I lifted straight from the pages of history as well. The chateau-turned-field-hospital in my story is based on one that actually existed. Darcy’s “going over the top” at the Battle of the Somme, an explosion at Messines Ridge, and a chaplain serving in the operating room were real historical events. And finally, I have a colorful Scotsman tell two outlandish stories that are true as well.

What would you say to romance readers who “don’t do war stories?”

I would say the Darcy’s Hope saga isn’t a war story. It’s very much a romance in a wartime setting. Just like Downton Abbey, the war provides a dramatic backdrop against which the romance blooms. The war’s fast pace and ever-changing situations meant that nothing was predictable, and things could (and did) change in an instant. Readers have commented that they couldn’t predict where either story was going, and much of that is due to the volatile nature of the setting.

Did you face any particular challenges in writing the Darcy’s Hope saga?

Yes! In Beauty from Ashes, weaving a romance into a complex setting unfamiliar to most readers, with both the hero and heroine experiencing significant character evolutions, all in the context of a mystery was quite a feat. Donwell Abbey wasn’t any easier. Writing to accommodate the tragedy that befalls Darcy was an enormous challenge. (I can’t tell you what the injury is or the accommodation it required or I would be giving away a major spoiler!)

Now that the Darcy’s Hope saga has received such glowing reviews, does it make it all the research and hard work worth it?

Yes. Hearing that readers love it on so many levels is immensely gratifying. The frustration and angst of three years of hard work fades away.

Do you have any final thoughts for readers?

As the world is commemorating the hundredth anniversary of WWI, I would challenge you to pay attention. Watch documentaries or even read books like my Darcy’s Hope saga to glimpse into the past for a better understanding of what our great-grandfathers experienced and the sacrifices they made. Each soldier, stretcher-bearer, doctor, and nurse has his or her own interesting story. And although my Fitzwilliam Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet are fictitious characters, if you have any fondness for Downton Abbey or Jane Austen’s works, I think you will find their story as told in The Darcy’s Hope Saga not only fascinating, but riveting and moving as well.

Thanks for hosting me today!

Thank you for stopping by today, Ginger! I hope my readers enjoy these books as much as I did!

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DH Saga rose cover NEW flat

Escape to the era of Downton Abbey with Lizzy and Darcy!

Immerse yourself in this romantic and drama-filled saga that includes two full-length Pride and Prejudice variations—
Darcy’s Hope ~ Beauty from Ashes and
Darcy’s Hope at Donwell Abbey.

~Volume I: Darcy’s Hope ~ Beauty from Ashes:

Heartbroken. Devastated. WWI Captain Fitzwilliam Darcy was rejected by the woman he loved and vows, “No more sentimental entanglements!”

But an undercover assignment at a field hospital brings him face to face with his beloved Elizabeth—who’s working with a dashing American doctor and a prime suspect in the espionage plot.

Forced to grapple with his feelings for her, Darcy has only a few months build a lasting bridge to her and uncover the truth before she’s condemned to a traitor’s noose.

~Volume II: Darcy’s Hope at Donwell Abbey:

Darcy has won the heart of Elizabeth Bennet. Finally.

Then she vanishes.

Still reeling from the loss, Darcy attempts a heroic feat and only survives by the daring rescue of his faithful batman John Thornton.

But the damage is done. Darcy is plunged into a dark and silent world.

Sent to Donwell Abbey to recover, he’s coaxed back to life by an extraordinary nurse determined to teach him how to live and love again. A woman whose uncanny similarities to Elizabeth invite his admiration and entice his affections.

His heart tells him to hold on to Elizabeth.

His head tells him to take a chance with his nurse.

But a secret at Donwell Abbey just might change everything…

Buy on Amazon

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