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Mailbox Monday — October 20

Welcome to Mailbox Monday, the weekly meme where book lovers share the titles they received for review, purchased, or otherwise obtained over the past week. It is now being hosted at the Mailbox Monday blog.

Here’s what I added to the shelves over the past week:

For Review:

jane austen cover to coverJane Austen Cover to Cover by Margaret C. Sullivan — from Quirk Books

Jane Austen Never Goes Out of Style

Since the first publication of her six novels in the 19th century, she has delighted generations of fans with classic stories that have never changed — and countless covers that have.  Jane Austen Cover to Cover compiles two centuries of design showcasing one of the world’s most beloved and celebrated novelists.  With over 200 images, plus historical commentary, Austen trivia, and a little bit of wit, this fascinating and visually intriguing look back is a must for Janeites, design enthusiasts, and book lovers of every age.  (publisher’s summary)

botticelli's bastardBotticelli’s Bastard by Stephen Maitland-Lewis — from the author

Art restorer Giovanni Fabrizzi is haunted by an unsigned renaissance portrait.  Obsessed to learn the truth of its origin, he becomes increasingly convinced the painting could be the work of one of history’s greatest artists, which if true, would catapult its value to the stratosphere.  But in learning of the painting’s past, he is faced with a dilemma.  He believes the portrait was stolen during the greatest art heist in history — the Nazi plunder of European artwork.  If true and a surviving relative of the painting’s rightful owner were still alive, Giovanni, in all good conscience, would have to give up the potential masterpiece.  His obsession with the portrait puts a strain on his new marriage, and his son thinks his father has lost his mind for believing an unremarkable, unsigned painting could be worth anyone’s attention.  Regardless, Giovanni persists in his quest of discovery and exposes far more truth than he ever wanted to know.  (publisher’s summary)

What books did you add to your shelves recently?

© 2014 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

land of dreams

Source: Review copy from William Morrow
Rating: ★★★★☆

I couldn’t paint.  I had nothing to say.  My art had left me and all I could do was capture the story behind the eyes of a pretty girl.  Somehow, in the past few weeks, I had become silenced.  My voice was gone and I was becoming ever less certain that it would return.

(from Land of Dreams, page 165)

Quick summary: Land of Dreams is the last installment in Kate Kerrigan’s Ellis Island trilogy that follows headstrong Ellie Hogan, who has left Ireland for good to forge a new life in New York City.  Set in 1942, Ellie has become a well-known artist and is raising her adopted sons, Leo and Tom, on Fire Island off the Long Island shore.  She has settled into the quiet life of an artist, but all that changes when 16-year-old Leo runs away from his boarding school to Hollywood to become an actor.  It’s not long before Ellie, Tom, and her old friend Bridie have forged a new life in Los Angeles.  Ellie has lost her creativity, and after the loss of two husbands, she thinks her desire to love and be loved has left her as well.  Amidst the fame and greed of Hollywood, the Japanese internment camps, and memories of the life she left behind, Ellie embarks on a friendship with a Polish composer, Stan, and puts her dreams on the sidelines to give her son a chance to live his own.

Why I wanted to read it: I really enjoyed the first two books in the trilogy, Ellis Island and City of Hope, and I wanted to find out how Kerrigan concludes Ellie’s story.

What I liked: Land of Dreams can be read as a standalone novel.  Of course, you’ll care more about Ellie if you read all three books in order, but Kerrigan provides enough back story so you won’t feel too lost — which was good for me since it’s been a year since I read the previous books, and I needed a quick update.  I love the character of Ellie.  She has gone through so much in her 42 years, but she has always managed to pull herself up, adapt, and move forward.  Having long wanted to be a mother, Ellie would do anything for Tom and Leo, putting them first in all things.  The first-person narrative helps emphasize how much she has endured and how much she has sacrificed, and Kerrigan does a great job ensuring that readers understand Ellie, even when they don’t agree with her.  Hollywood in the 1940s is an intriguing setting, but Kerrigan doesn’t let readers forget that there is a war going on.  The fighting may be happening elsewhere, but the tensions and the animosity toward anyone with a connection to Germany and Japan, however slight, is very real and very dangerous.  However, Kerrigan also doesn’t let the war take center stage.

What I disliked: The only thing I didn’t like was having to say goodbye to Ellie when I turned the last page.

Final thoughts: Ellie’s fierce love for her children shines through, and the same take-charge attitude and adaptability that enabled her to survive hunger, build successful businesses, and keep going after tough losses help her see through the glitz and glamor of Hollywood.  Even while stepping aside to let her son shine, Ellie cannot completely hide in the shadows, and the relationships she forges in Hollywood make her realize she still has much to learn about life, love, and creativity.  Land of Dreams is a satisfying conclusion to the Ellis Island trilogy, which centers on love and loss, family, the immigrant experience, and the American Dream.  The trilogy spans the years of the Irish War of Independence, the Great Depression, and World War II and follows a woman who was truly ahead of her time.

Thanks to TLC Book Tours for having me on the tour for Land of Dreams.  To follow the tour, click here.

war challenge with a twist

Book 23 for the War Challenge With a Twist (WWII)

historical fiction challenge

Book 23 for the Historical Fiction Challenge

Disclosure: I received Land of Dreams from William Morrow for review.

© 2014 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

Mailbox Monday — October 13

Welcome to Mailbox Monday, the weekly meme where book lovers share the titles they received for review, purchased, or otherwise obtained over the past week. It is now being hosted at the Mailbox Monday blog.

Here’s what I added to the shelves over the past couple of weeks:

For Review:

At Home With Mr. DarcyAt Home With Mr. Darcy by Victoria Connelly — from the author

The Austen Addicts are back!

It’s summer and renowned actress, Dame Pamela Harcourt, has organised a treat: the first Purley Hall Jane Austen holiday — to the home of Mr. Darcy no less.

With Katherine and Warwick, Robyn, Dorris Norris and the rest of the gang, it’s going to be a trip to remember.  But then a hardened journalist and a non-Janeite, Melissa Barry, joins the party.  Fearing a stitch-up, the friends rally together, hoping to convince Melissa that the only way is Austen…  (publisher’s summary)

land of dreamsLand of Dreams by Kate Kerrigan — from William Morrow

Irish immigrant Ellie Hogan has finally achieved the American Dream.  But her comfortable bohemian life on Fire Island, New York, is shattered when her eldest adopted son, Leo, runs away, lured by the promise of fortune and fame in Hollywood.  Determined to keep her family intact, Ellie follows him west, uprooting her youngest son and long-time friend Bridie.

In Los Angeles, Ellie creates a fashionable new home among the city’s celebrities, artists, and movie moguls.  She is also drawn into intense new friendships with talented film composer Stan, a man far different from any she has ever met, and Suri, a beautiful Japanese women and kindred spirit, who opens Ellie’s eyes to the injustices of her adopted country.

While Leo is dazzled by Hollywood’s glitz, Ellie quickly sees that the golden glamour masks a world of vanity and greed.  Though she tries to navigate the family around heartbreak and the dangers of their new home, she will not be able to protect them from a darker threat: war.  (publisher’s summary)

The Color of Courage by Julian Kulski — from Aquila Polonica

“If there is going to be a war, I do not want to miss it.”

-Julian Kulski, age 10, Warsaw, Poland

A rare and fascinating look at WWII through the eyes of a child.

This remarkable diary follows Kulski, a 10-year-old Boy Scout when WWII begins, as he is recruited into the clandestine Polish Underground Army by his Scoutmaster, undertakes a secret mission into Warsaw Ghetto, is captured by the Gestapo, sentenced to Auschwitz, rescued, fights in a Polish Commando unit in the Warsaw Uprising, and ends as a 16-year-old German POW.  (publisher’s summary)

if i knew you were going to be this beautifulIf I Knew You Were Going to Be This Beautiful I Never Would Have Let You Go by Judy Chicurel — a surprise from Putnam

No matter how beautiful some dreams are, there comes a time when we must let them go. It is the summer of 1972, and Katie has just turned eighteen. Katie and her town, Elephant Beach, are both on the verge: Katie of adulthood, and Elephant Beach of gentrification. But not yet: Elephant Beach is still gritty, working-class, close-knit. And Katie spends her time smoking and drinking with her friends, dreaming about a boy just back from Vietnam who’s still fighting a battle Katie can’t understand. In this poignant, evocative debut collection, Judy Chicurel creates a haunting, vivid world, where conflicts between mothers and daughters, men and women, soldiers and civilians and haves and have-nots reverberate to our own time. She captures not only a time and place, but the universal experience of being poised between the past and the future.  (publisher’s summary)

past encountersPast Encounters by Davina Blake — from Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours

From the moment Rhoda Middleton opens one of her husband’s letters and finds it is from another woman, she is convinced he is having an affair.  But when Rhoda tracks her down, she discovers the mysterious woman is not his lover after all, but the wife of his best friend, Archie Foster.  There is only one problem — Rhoda has never even heard of Archie Foster.

Devastated by this betrayal of trust, Rhoda tries to find out how and why her husband, Peter, has kept this friendship hidden for so long.  Her search leads her back to 1945, but as she gradually uncovers Peter’s wartime secrets she must wrestle with painful memories of her own.  For if they are ever to understand each other, Rhoda too must escape the ghosts of the past.

Taking us on a journey from the atmospheric filming of Brief Encounter, to the extraordinary Great March of prisoners of war through snow-bound Germany, this is a novel of friendship, hope, and how in the end, it is the small things that enable love to survive.  (publisher’s summary)

Gift:

the madness of mr. darcyThe Madness of Mr. Darcy by Alexa Adams — from the author

**I’m excited about the fact that I edited this book!  Check out an excerpt and an international giveaway here (closes Sunday, October 19)

The year is 1832 and regrets beleaguer Fitzwilliam Darcy.  All he ever cared for has been taken from him: his pride, his sister, and his true love, Elizabeth Bennet.  Now, having nearly murdered a man in a fit of rage, he might lose Pemberley, too.  More than just his home, his very identity is at stake.  In desperation, he seeks the help of Dr. Frederick Wilson, owner and proprietor of Ramsey House, a madhouse for fine ladies and gentlemen.  Is Darcy’s confinement the inevitable end to his tortured descent, or will he rediscover what he lost in the most unlikely of places?  (publisher’s summary)

Free ebook:

19321932 by Karen M. Cox

“…the last man in the world I could ever be prevailed upon to marry.”  When Elizabeth Bennet left Fitzwilliam Darcy with those words, she was a sheltered, naïve girl who had never felt the sting of real poverty.  What if her circumstances were more precarious?  Would she still express herself using those harsh words?  What if she were the victim of a raging storm of worldwide economic hardship that touched virtually everyone?  How would the consequences of that hardship affect the other beloved characters of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice?  If Elizabeth thought she was running out of options, what would happen then?  1932 is a twist on Jane Austen’s classic tale.  Elizabeth Bennet has always led a pampered existence as the daughter of a university professor in the Midwest until the safety of her world dissolves around her due to unforeseen adversity.  Amidst the ensuing upheaval, what — and who — might she discover as she rebuilds a life for herself and her family in the sleepy, backwater town of Meryton?  (publisher’s summary)

From the library sale:

great houseGreat House by Nicole Krauss

For twenty-five years, a reclusive American novelist has been writing at the desk she inherited from a young Chilean poet who disappeared at the hands of Pinochet’s secret police.  One day a girl claiming to be the poet’s daughter arrives to take it away, sending the writer’s life reeling.  Across the ocean, in the leafy suburbs of London, a man caring for his dying wife discovers, among her papers, a lock of hair that unravels a terrible secret.  In Jerusalem, an antiques dealer slowly reassembles his father’s study, plundered by the Nazis in Budapest in 1944.

Connecting these stories is a desk of many drawers that exerts a power over those who possess it or have given it away.  Great House is a story haunted by questions: What do we pass on to our children and how do they absorb our dreams and losses?  How do we respond to disappearance, destruction, and change?

Nicole Krauss has written a soaring, powerful novel about memory struggling to create a meaningful permanence in the face of inevitable loss.  (publisher’s summary)

while we're far apartWhile We’re Far Apart by Lynn Austin

In an unassuming apartment building in Brooklyn, New York, three lives intersect as the reality of war invades their lives.

Young Esther is heartbroken when her father decides to enlist in the army shortly after the death of her mother.

Penny Goodrich has been in love with Eddie Shaffer for as long as she can remember; now that Eddie’s wife is dead, Penny feels she’s been given a second chance and offers to care for his children, hoping he will finally notice her and marry her after the war.

And elderly Mr. Mendel, the landlord, waits for the war to end to hear what has happened to his son trapped in war-torn Hungary.

Broken and hurting, yet drawn together through difficult circumstances, a new kind of family is forged…to face the return they’ve all been waiting for.  (publisher’s summary)

cocktails for threeCocktails for Three by Madeleine Wickham

At the first of every month, when the office has reached its pinnacle of hysteria, Maggie, Roxanne, and Candice meet at London’s swankiest bar for an evening of cocktails and gossip.  Here, they chat about what’s new at The Londoner, the glossy fashion magazine where they all work, and everything else that’s going on in their lives.  Or almost everything.  Beneath the girl talk and the laughter, each of the three have a secret.  And when a chance encounter at the cocktail bar sets in motion an extraordinary chain of events, each one will find her biggest secret revealed.

In Cocktails for Three, Madeleine Wickham combines her trademark humor with remarkable insight to create an edgy, romantic tale of secrets, strangers, and a splash of scandal.  (publisher’s summary)

the fault in our starsThe Fault in Our Stars by John Green

(I read this already, but I borrowed it from my daughter and wanted my own copy.)

Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten. (publisher’s summary)

What books did you add to your shelves recently?

© 2014 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

GI Brides

Source: Review copy from William Morrow
Rating: ★★★★★

When they had married, it had been in the midst of a war that seemed never-ending.  She had accepted Raymond’s ring without considering the fact that one day it would mean following him halfway across the world.  But now, as she waited for her orders to join him in America, she began to question what she had done.

(from GI Brides, page 174)

Quick summary: GI Brides profiles just four of the more than 70,000 British women who married American soldiers during World War II and followed them to the United States, including author Nuala Calvi’s grandmother, Margaret. Based on interviews with the women, the book goes into detail about each of their lives during the war, how they met their GI husbands, and what life was like for them in a new country as they raised their families.

Why I wanted to read it: I had no idea there were so many war brides, and I was curious about how these women fared after leaving their homes and families to start anew in a strange country.

What I liked: GI Brides reads like a novel, which makes it very easy to get absorbed in the stories of these women. Duncan Barrett and Nuala Calvi obviously did a lot of research, and they present the stories of Sylvia, Rae, Margaret, and Lyn in such a way that I cared about them and felt like they were old friends. Pictures are included so readers can put faces to the names, and I found myself flipping to them many times while I read.

What I disliked: The chapters alternate among the women, and at first that made it difficult for me to keep track of their stories, especially if I put the book down for a day or two before coming back to it. That didn’t keep me from loving the book, though.

Final thoughts: Sylvia, Rae, Margaret, and Lyn came from different backgrounds, but they had a lot in common. These women each found a way to do their part for the war effort, whether volunteering at a Red Cross club like Sylvia or joining the Auxiliary Territorial Service like Rae. Despite each of them finding love or at least some semblance of happiness with their American soldiers, these women experienced many challenges and hardships. Most importantly, these women were strong, adventurous, and able to overcome the various obstacles thrown in their paths. GI Brides is a fascinating book about just a few of the many women brave enough to cross an ocean — on their own — for a chance at love, with no guarantees that it would work out or that they would ever see their families again.

Thanks to TLC Book Tours for having me on the tour for GI Brides. To follow the tour, click here.

war challenge with a twist

Book 22 for the War Challenge With a Twist (WWII)

Book 1 for the Nonfiction Reading Challenge

Book 2 for the Nonfiction Reading Challenge

Disclosure: I received GI Brides from William Morrow for review.

© 2014 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

mad about the boy

Source: Personal library
Rating: ★★★★☆

11.15 p.m.  Look, stoppit.  For, as it says on the Dalai Lama’s Twitter: <@Dalai Lama We cannot avoid pain, we cannot avoid loss.  Contentment comes from the ease and flexibility with which we move though change.>

Maybe will go to yoga and become more flexible.

Or maybe will go out with friends and get plastered.

(from Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy, page 71)

Quick summary: Bridget Jones is back in all her embarrassing, hilarious, and endearing glory.  A single mother with two children, Bridget re-enters the dating scene, which has dramatically changed.  Soon, she is taking on the world of Twitter, writing a screenplay of a modern-day Hedda Gabler, and boasting a much younger boytoy.  She’s not sure she can handle this life alone…and she’s not the only one who thinks she could use some help.

Why I wanted to read it: I loved Bridget Jones’ Diary and Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason, and I wanted to see what Bridget had been up to since then.

What I liked: Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy is a pure comfort read, like curling up with a cup of tea and pouring out your heart with an old, familiar friend.  Bridget is the same as ever — still fumbling her way through life, still meaning well but mucking it all up, still making a fool of herself, and still making us laugh.  But she’s changed, too, and she really does try to put on a brave face for her children and do right by them.

Helen Fielding manages to work in some seriousness with all the humor, making sure we remember that Bridget is struggling through grief.  Without that steadying force in her life, Bridget was bound to come undone, and those were the most real parts of the novel.  I also loved that Bridget learns to embrace her 50-something self and feel sexy, even while being clumsy and out of sorts.  There’s also a hint of Pride and Prejudice, with the whole bad-first-impression thing going on.

What I disliked: The absence of Mark Darcy was something I knew about before I read the book, and while it allowed Fielding to explore the challenges of dating in the Internet era, single parenthood, and embracing who you are at any age, it was still difficult for me to get over.

Final thoughts: Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy was a satisfying continuation to the series.  It wasn’t without its flaws, but I was able to overlook them and just enjoy it for what it was — a lighthearted beach read.  (I did indeed indulge in this novel when I was in Ocean City, Maryland, in July.)  It was nice to catch up with Bridget, and I was pleased with how this chapter in her life wrapped up.  I hope Fielding will revisit Bridget and her gang — from her mother and Daniel Cleaver to the characters introduced here for the first time — again in the future.

Disclosure: Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy is from my personal library.

© 2014 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

the summer of long knives

Source: Review copy from author
Rating: ★★★☆☆

There was pleasure to be derived from having a false face to hide what the false heart knew.  Maybe, Rolf thought, that was what kept killers like this going when they weren’t strangling or stabbing or torturing.  Just the fun of shaking the maitre’d’s hand, complimenting him on his service and chef’s skill at fixing rabbit, while all the time thinking, you think I’m just a friendly face, but do you know what else these hands will do tonight?  Such thoughts would add spice to the mundane.  Every wave and smile and bit of small talk asks the social world the essential, but unspoken question: do you see me for what I am?

(from The Summer of Long Knives, pages 212-213)

Quick summary: Set in Munich in 1936, The Summer of Long Knives follows Kommisar Rolf Wundt as he navigates the fear and tensions in Nazi Germany to catch a killer who brutally murdered a member of the League of German Girls, carving a message into her bare chest.  Rolf and his wife, Klara, are desperate to escape Germany, as they are a target of the Nazi regime due to their political affiliations, but Rolf is told that he will not be able to leave until this case is solved.  However, as the Gestapo continues its takeover of the criminal police, Rolf soon learns that they care little about finding the real killer and everything about furthering their own agenda.  The Summer of Long Knives delves not only into Rolf’s determination to solve the case but also his marital troubles, as he is forced to seek out his former lover, both to extract information and to save her life.

Why I wanted to read it: I’d never read a crime thriller set in Nazi Germany.

What I liked: Jim Snowden definitely did a lot of research about the political climate after Adolf Hitler rose to power.  The Summer of Long Knives is an interesting take on the power struggles that occurred within the upper levels of the Nazi regime and how Nazi ideology led to many innocent people being arrested, subjected to show trials, and almost immediately executed.  Snowden does a good job showing how difficult it was for Rolf — a man haunted by his job and driven by a need for justice — to get real criminals off the street.  The case and all the twists and turns were interesting, as were appearances by historical figures like Hermann Göring, Heinrich Himmler, Reinhard Heydrich, and of course, Hitler.  This was also my first introduction to Albert Göring, Hermann’s brother, who apparently was known for helping Jews and political dissidents and for his opposition to Nazism.

What I disliked: The author went a little overboard with his descriptions, like using the phrase “blonde ocean of headage” to describe someone with blonde hair.  I also didn’t think Rolf’s actions always made sense, given the climate of the time.  If he was so desperate to solve the crime and leave Germany, of course, he was going to have to go over the heads of the Gestapo, but I find it hard to believe that he would have been able to talk to a Gestapo officer the way he did and still live.  After all, this book is set two years after the Night of the Long Knives — when Hitler purged those he viewed as a political threat — so I don’t think they would have had any qualms about making Rolf disappear. I also didn’t feel any kind of connection to Rolf and Klara and didn’t much care about their martial problems, though I did appreciate his willingness to risk his own safety in his quest for justice.

Final thoughts: My curiosity about the case and how Rolf would manage to find the killer given all the obstacles put in his path by the Nazis enabled me to overlook the flaws, and I was satisfied with the ending.  The book took a little horror-novel turn toward the end, but that just increased the excitement, especially since I didn’t find it overly graphic. Overall, I thought The Summer of Long Knives was an interesting novel about a fascinating period in history.

Thanks to TLC Book Tours for having me on the tour for The Summer of Long Knives. To follow the tour, click here.

war challenge with a twist

Book 21 for the War Challenge With a Twist (WWII)

historical fiction challenge

Book 22 for the Historical Fiction Challenge

Disclosure: I received The Summer of Long Knives from the author for review.

© 2014 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

the annoted persuasion

Source: Personal library
Rating: ★★★★★

Such a letter was not to be soon recovered from.  Half an hour’s solitude and reflection might have tranquillized her; but the ten minutes only, which now passed before she was interrupted, with all the restraints of her situation, could do nothing towards tranquillity.  Every moment rather brought fresh agitation.  It was an overpowering happiness.

(from The Annotated Persuasion, page 454)

Quick summary: I’m not going to rehash the plot of Persuasion, since this is my second time reading this novel, but you can click here if you’d like to read my thoughts after reading it for the first time.  I’m going to focus more on the annotations by David M. Shapard.  The Annotated Persuasion may seem long at just over 500 pages, but the actual novel is only half of the book.  Jane Austen’s words are on the left page, and Shapard’s annotations are conveniently placed on the right.

Why I wanted to read it: I sort of read all of Jane Austen’s novels blind the first time around, with only the minimal footnotes provided at the back of the various editions I own.  When I learned about Shapard’s annotated editions, chock full of information about the era during which Austen’s novels were written, I just had to add them to my Austen collection.

What I liked: Everything!  Shapard’s annotations cover everything from definitions of words that may be unfamiliar to modern readers to why Austen spelled words a certain way, from tidbits about the culture and society of the time to analyses of various passages, from illustrations of various buildings in Bath, clothing, and forms of transportation to maps that show where the characters lived and traveled.  These annotations made my second reading of Persuasion a thoroughly enjoyable experience.  I finished the novel for the second time with a richer understanding of the characters and the time period and a better appreciation for Austen’s genius.  And best of all, putting the text of the novel and the annotations side by side eliminates the annoyance of having to constantly flip to the back of the book to read the footnotes.

What I disliked: Honestly, I found nothing to dislike about The Annotated Persuasion, which was not surprising to me because I already knew I loved the novel.  However, I think the extensive annotations may be both a help and a hindrance to readers taking on Persuasion for the first time.  With numerous annotations per page, it might be distracting to read a bit of the novel, shift to the annotations, read more of the novel, and then shift back to the annotations.  I never felt lost because I always knew where I was in the story and what would happen next, but I could see how easy it would be to get lost if you were reading it for the first time.

Final thoughts: The Annotated Persuasion is the perfect book for Austen fans or readers who simply want to delve deeper into the story of Anne Elliot and Captain Wentworth.  Shapard covers so many topics that it’s impossible to list them all, but it’s obvious he has done his homework in order to provide a comprehensive analysis of the novel.  Most of all, I loved revisiting one of my favorite novels, and I loved it ever more the second time around.  I can’t wait to read the other annotated editions by Shapard that are currently in my collection: The Annotated Pride and Prejudice, The Annotated Emma, and The Annotated Sense and SensibilityThe Annotated Northanger Abbey is on my wish list, and you can bet I’ll be adding The Annotated Mansfield Park to my collection when it is released next year.

Disclosure: The Annotated Persuasion is from my personal library.

© 2014 Anna Horner of Diary of an Eccentric. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce or republish content without permission.

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